February 2011


BEEP Professionals Show Students Perseverance Roadmap to Success

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DSU Alumni BEEP professionals (l-r): Alfonso Jones, Ronald Pinkett, LaCresha Millner, John Ridgeway, DSU President Harry L. Williams, Jonas Acquah, Melissa Carpenter, Kevin Washington and Malachi Allen. The eight alums returned to their alma mater to participate in the Feb. 24 BEEP event.

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    The DSU College of Business held its annual Black Executive Exchange Program (BEEP) and Alumni Open House on Feb. 22 under the theme “Perseverance – A Roadmap to Success. DSU alumnus Kevin Washington, regional vice president of Primerica Financial Service, gives DSU student his thoughts during a BEEP forum  panel discussion on the "Challenges in Today's Economy".   Nineteen BEEP professionals – recognize during this event as “visiting professors” – participated in the daylong event that feature workshops, roundtable and forum discussions, mock interviews and a wealth of interaction between DSU College of Business students and the visiting professionals.   The group included eight DSU alumni (listed below with an asterisk*).   The event culminated with a case study competition between four teams of DSU students. The teams each presented their case study on Starbucks and Conservation International, with the winning group being Team 3 whose members were Stephen Bowe, Erika Grant, Kiara Watts and Victoria Williams. Each winning member was awarded a $300 book scholarship.   The visiting professors were:   Jonas Acquah* – financial control analyst, J.P. Morgan Malachi Allen* – senior accountant, BNY Mellon Asset Servicing Roxanne Allen – human resource manager, UPS Sheldon Allen – director of sales, UPS Kevin Bankett – division manager, UPS Melissa Carpenter* special agent, UPS Larry Chamberlain – division manager, UPS Anthony Heath, UPS Valerie James, assistant vice president, CIGNA HealthCare Jimmie Jennings, division manager, UPS Alfonso Jones* youth aid officer, Delaware State Police LaCresha Milner* senior audit associate, KPMG LLP Ronald Pinkett* chief financial officer, Brandywine Counseling & Community Services John Ridgeway* corporate manager, Toyota Damond Thorington, area safety manager, Supervalu Kevin Washington* regional vice president, Primerica Financial Services Thomas White, UPS Myron Williams, UPS Charles Wright III, vice president of Institutional Advancement, Peirce College.  

DSU Student Selected to be NASA Ambassador

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  A Delaware State University undergraduate student has been selected to be among a nationwide group of top interns that will serve as ambassadors for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). DSU senior Harry N. Burton III will serve as a NASA ambassador.   Harry N. Burton III, a senior physics/pre-engineering major at DSU, has been selected for the NASA ambassadorship, which he hopes will pay future professional dividends.   “I applied to get connected with NASA and possibly get a job with them,” said Mr. Burton, who is a resident of Dover and a 2007 graduate of Dover High School. “I think their mission is significant in science.”   As one of the 105 NASA ambassadors selected nationwide, Mr. Burton will give presentations in the Delmarva region, work at job fairs and conduct other outreach endeavors on behalf of the space agency.   Mr. Burton is the second DSU student to be selected for the NASA ambassadorship. In 2010 Bryan E. Greenly, currently senior physics major, was the first-ever DSU student selected for the honor.  

DSU's Dr. Kevina Vulinec Named as Fulbright Scholar

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Dr. Kevina Vulinec and graduate student Megan Wallrichs take data from a red bat in a DSU lab. Dr. Vulinec will continue her bat research as a Fulbright scholar in the rainforests of Brazil.

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    Dr. Kevina Vulinec, a DSU associate professors in natural resources, has been awarded a competitive Fulbright Scholar grant to lecture and do research in the South American country of Brazil as part of her ongoing work on bat species.   Specifically Dr. Vulinec will work with Dr. Paulo Estefano Dineli Bobrowiec from the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas de Amazonia in Brazil. She will teach and conduct research on seed-dispersing bats in Brazil’s fragmented tropical rainforest.   A large amount of Brazil’s rainforests have been lost to human activities such as logging, reducing it to one-eighth of the size it was 1½ centuries ago. Because it is home to an impressive number of endangered plants and animal species, the rainforest is considered to be a threatened biodiversity area.   Dr. Vulinec’s research will focus on the impact of rainforest fragmentation on the seed-dispersing bats – a species that disperse the seeds from fruits it eats, and thereby replenishing the rainforest with seeds that grow into new plants and fruits.   In addition, Dr. Vulinec will conduct a workshop for the Instituto Nacional’s students on nocturnal wildlife audio-video technology.   Dr. Vulinec will arrive in Brazil to begin her work on Feb. 21. The Fulbright research and teaching experience will continue until late May.   “It is an incredible opportunity,” Dr. Vulinec said. “It is the best award for getting people out for scholarship purposes.”   Dr. Vulinec’s findings will be accessed by the Biological Fragmentation Project, the world largest-scale and longest-running study of habitat fragmentation, operated cooperatively by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and Brazil’s National Institute for Amazonian Research.   The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.    

DSU's Dr. Finger Wright Honored for Role in Greensboro Protests

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DSU's Dr. Dolores Finger Wright (center) celebrates her award with the surviving "Greensboro Four": (l-r) Franklin McCain, Ret. Maj. Gen. Joseph McNeil, Jibree Khazan and Donald Brandon.

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    Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, a DSU associate professor of social work, has recently been honored for the role she played in the historic public accommodations demonstrations in Greensboro, N.C. during the early 1960s. Dr. Dolores Finger Wright (l) with award presenter Ret. Maj. Gen. Joseph McNeil, on of the "Greensboro Four."   Dr. Finger Wright received the International Civil Rights Center & Museum Sit-In Hero’s Award on Feb. 5 during the 51st Anniversary Gala Commemorating the Greensboro Sit-ins.   During the tumultuous 1960s in Greensboro, the DSU associate professor was an undergraduate student in Bennett College for Women. Her extracurricular activity from her bachelor’s degree pursuit was working behind the scene during the Greensboro demonstrations and taking part in the picket lines.   Presenting the award to Dr. Finger Wright was Ret. Maj. Gen. Joseph McNeil, one of the “Greensboro Four” that gained worldwide notoriety for their sit-ins protests at segregated lunch counters in Greensboro in 1960.   “Delores would picket during the days to integrate the stores,” said Ret. Maj. Gen. McNeil. “She would work the picket lines at night to integrate the movie theatres, which was dangerous in Greensboro.”   Dr. Finger Wright said that she also worked behind the scenes strategizing with her Bennett College sisters, professors, as well as through her affiliations with the NAACP and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).   The group formed a vanguard that would picket and demonstrate, and many – including Dr. Finger Wright – were arrested in the course of their protests.   “I saw my participation as an epiphany, moving from late adolescence to early adulthood all in the matter of days,” Dr. Finger Wright said. “That’s what my rearing was about – doing what’s right. So I had to be a part of it.”   After her graduation from Bennett College, Dr. Finger Wright would on to earn a Master of Social Work Degree from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in Social Work from Howard University. She has been a social work faculty member at DSU for 21 years.   The Gala was held at the Joseph S. Koury Convention Center in Greensboro.  

DSU and State Sign Agreement to Enroll "Aged Out" Foster Youths

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and Secretary Vivian Rapposelli of the state Department of Services for Children, Youth and their Families sign a formal agreement that will enroll in the University two foster youths a year who have "aged out" of foster care and are academically eligible..

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    Delaware State University and the State Division of Family Services (DFS) announced a new initiative today that will make higher education a reality for eligible foster youths.   DSU President Harry L. Williams and Vivian Rapposelli, Secretary of the Department of Services for Children, Youth and their Families, signed a formal agreement today (Feb. 14) that will annually provide an opportunity for two foster youths who reach the age of 18 to pursue a bachelor’s degree at Delaware State University. State Sen. Brian Bushweller, state Rep. Darryl Scott, state Rep. William Carson, state Rep. LIncoln Willis, attended the agreement signing to show their support for the initiative.   Although unable to attend the agreement signing due to a schedule conflict, Gov. Jack Markell today expressed his strong support of the program.   “This is about giving kids who've been dealt a difficult hand a chance for further success. It's about the opportunity to work hard, stay focused and accomplish their dreams,’ Gov. Markell said. “The University and the Department have created a partnership that will bring great students to the school and give them opportunities for the future.” Secretary Rapposelli said that youths who age out of foster care face the same obstacles as other young adults, but often without the support of their families.   “This partnership with DSU provides the students it supports with stability, hope and peace of mind – allowing them to start the next phase of their lives on a solid foundation,” Secretary Rapposelli said. “We are grateful to DSU and excited for the many young men and women who will benefit from this opportunity.”   The DFS will identify two foster youths per year who have aged out (turned 18) of foster care, are academically eligible and personally motivated to attend DSU. The state agency will assist the foster youths in completing the necessary academic and financial paperwork   DSU will give the enrolled foster youths access to year-round on-campus housing and to its student support services, assist them in the completion of the financial aid process and help them identify scholarship opportunities.   “With community and outreach being among DSU’s five core values, this opportunity to help worthy foster youths achieve their dreams is consistent with the University’s standing as a valuable education asset to the state,” President Williams said.   The foster youths will receive state financial support in the form of Educational and Training Vouchers and Housing Vouchers. In the event there is a shortfall of state funds, the foster youths will be expected to apply for student loans or other financial aid opportunities to cover the shortfall.   There are over 700 children in Delaware’s foster care system. In fiscal 2010, there were 94 foster youths that aged out of the system.    

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