August 2012


DSU Receives National Marketing & Recruitment Award

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Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement and chief of staff, and Erin Hill, executive director of Admission, show the Marketing & Recruitment Award they received on behalf of DSU at the recent National Conference on Student Recruitment, Marketing and Retention in Chicago, IL.

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Delaware State University has been awarded the Noel Levitz 2012 Marketing-Recruitment Excellence Award for its significant strides made over the last seven years in the area of enrollment management.   Awarded on July 26 during the National Conference on Student Recruitment, Marketing and Retention, DSU was one of four universities to receive the prized award, joining Averett University of Danville, Va.; Oral Roberts University of Tulsa, Okla.; and Salisbury University in Salisbury, Md.   Accepting the award on behalf of DSU President Harry L. Williams and the University were Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement and chief of staff, and Erin Hill, executive director of Admissions.   According to Noel Levitz, DSU received the award for its implementation of a comprehensive enrollment management model and for the resulting record increase in enrollment to 4,178 in the fall of 2011.   In addition, DSU was also commended for increasing its net tuition revenue and its mean academic profile, as well as for the increase of its retention rate for new freshmen (from 64% in 2007 to 70.5% in 2011). It was also cited for exemplary market plans and communiques.   “Delaware State University exemplifies how to successfully use innovative strategies to promote student awareness, increase enrollment, and improve student retention and completion,” said Sarah Coen, Noel-Levitz vice president. “We are pleased to recognize DSU with a 2012 Marketing-Recruitment Excellence Award.”   Noel-Levitz is a nationally recognized higher education consulting firm that focuses on strategic planning for enrollment and student success.

WDDE 91.1 FM Launches Broadcast from the DSU Campus

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(L-r) Susan Swan, WDDE director of communications; Amir Mohammedi, executive vice president of Finance and Administration; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Ann Ahl, Delaware 1st Media board chairwoman; Marsha Corcoran,WDDE director of development;  Mike Szczechura, director of corporate support, gather for a photo on the first day of the new radio station's broadcast.

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“From Delaware State University, this is 91.1 WDDE, Dover!!!!!” Those words rang out at noon Friday, Aug. 17, as the first-ever Delaware-focused public radio station was launched into the airwaves. The only Delaware-based source for National Public Radio programming is based on the DSU campus in the former ROTC/Center for Teaching and Learning building across the street from the rear of the ETV Building. DSU President Harry L. Williams (shown celebrating the WDDE's inaugural broadcast with l-r Susan Swan, director of communications, and Ann Ahl, Del. 1st Media board chair), the establishment of the radio station is a positive development for the University. DSU President Harry L. Williams was at the radio station for its launch. “It’s a great day for DSU and WDDE-FM,” Dr. Williams said. “Now you will hear the name Delaware State University 24 hours a day.” WDDE-FM is owned by Delaware First Media, the nonprofit company that operates the online multimedia news service DFM News. DSU and the University of Delaware have joined Delaware First Media (DFM) in a historic collaboration to launch WDDE-FM. WDDE 91.1 FM now broadcasts into all three counties, serving a Delaware audience of more than 800,000 on-air and online listeners with nonpartisan local, national and international news. “WDDE is a major step in Delaware’s evolution as a state with a strong news media that connects Delawareans downstate and upstate to create a shared community culture,” said Delaware First Media President Micheline Boudreau. “We are thrilled to launch this project with the strong sponsorship of Delaware’s premier universities.” WDDE will generate original, substantive news coverage of Delaware events and people that is urgently needed in a state with few local news sources. “Some Delawareans can tune into out-of-state public radio stations, but when they break for local news, they’re not focusing on what’s happening in Delaware’s legislature, at a Delaware theater, in Delaware schools,” said Ms. Boudreau. “On WDDE you’ll find out what’s going on right here where we live.” WDDE will have a national impact as well. WDDE reports about Delaware will be exported to National Public Radio’s audience of more than 26 million listeners nationwide. NPR officials welcomed the news. “Local stations serving communities across this nation are the strength and backbone of public media,” said NPR CEO Gary Knell. “We are very excited about the prospect of WDDE-91.1FM in Delaware joining the NPR family of member stations.” “Every day, great stories about Delaware go untold,” Ms. Boudreau said. “Important stories about the legislature, about this year’s election, about our vibrant arts community, about innovations in education, about Delaware’s unique legal community, about its industries – we want to start telling these stories now.”

DSU's Dr. Vincent Fondong Receives $1M Research Grant

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Dr. Vincent Fondong, associate professor of biological sciences, has received a $1 million grant to find a solution to make the cassava plant -- a food staple of Africa and South America -- resistant to viruses.

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Dr. Vincent N. Fondong, DSU professor of biology, grew up working in cassava fields of his native Cameroon. Dr. Vincent Fondong does studies on cassava plants in a field in his native Cameroon.   Now, he has been awarded a $1 million competitive research grant to fight viruses that threaten that major food stable crop in his native country as well as in parts of Africa and the Indian subcontinent.   Dr. Fondong, the principal investigator, was awarded the three-year grant from a partnership between the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Science Foundation. His project relates to one of the primary aims of the Gates Foundation – to enhance health care and reduce extreme poverty.   Cassava produces edible tuberous roots and is the third-largest source of carbohydrates in the tropical regions of the world. It is part of the diet of about 500 million people worldwide. Cassava yields around the world are reduced by plant viruses such as African cassava mosaic virus and the cassava brown streak virus.   In this research project, Dr. Fondong will genetically engineer cassava for resistance to these viruses.   Dr. Fondong’s cassava research took him this summer to Cameroon and Uganda in west and east Africa, respectively.   “In Cameroon during this trip, I was able to isolate some of these viruses for my research,” Dr. Fondong said. “Cameroon is a country where we are intensifying our efforts because it is a new hot spot for these viruses.”   Collaborating with Dr. Fondong are three co-principal investigators: Dr. Stephen Winter, German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Culture, Braunschweig, Germany; Dr. Kone Mongomake, University of Abobo-Adjame, Ivory Coast; and Dr. Oumar Doungous, Institute of Agriculture Research for Development, Cameroon.   “Our mandate is to come up with a solution for the whole of Africa that could also be applied to the Indian subcontinent and Latin America,” said Dr. Fondong, who has been a DSU faculty member since 2002. (L-r) Latasha Keller and Brittany Marine, biological science graduate students check on some cassava plant samples in a Mishoe Science Center refrigerator, Dr. Fondong's project give graduate and undergraduate students an opportunity to take part in the research work.   The award, which was one of three awards nationwide this year, comes from the BREAD – Basic Research to Enable Agriculture Development program– which was established by the Gates Foundation/NSF partnership as a competitive award program for science research projects that address drought, pests, disease and other serious problems facing small farmers and their families.   Grants are awarded to projects like Dr. Fondong’s that seek to develop innovative approaches and technologies to boost agriculture productivity in developing countries.

DSU Holds Freshmen Induction Ceremony: Photo Slideshow

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DSU's newest freshman class stands to take the oath of New Student Commitment, in which students accepted the University's call to leadership and to continue the legacy of the institution as leaders, dreamers, achievers and scholars.

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Delaware State University formally embraced its newest students – the Class of 2016 – during its traditional Freshmen Induction Ceremony on Sunday, Aug. 26 in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus. See the below photo slideshow for images from the event, followed by more information about the ceremony:   This year’s freshman class, which is over 900 students, heard from DSU President Harry Williams, along with Dr. Bradley Skelcher, associate provost; Dr. Robin Roberts and Kamillah Lewis, director and associate director, respectively, of the Office of Student Leadership  and Activities; and from Shelbe Hudson, president of the Student Government Association. The event included a Hornet Pinning and Candle Lighting Ceremony, and the freshman class took the oath of New Student Commitment of Living the Legacy: A Call to Leadership. In reciting the oath, the students vowed to model their conduct upon by the University's core values, to embrace its culturally diverse community, to be good citizens, and to know that as the newest members of the Hornet Nation, they are destined for greatness on this campus and beyond.

Accreditation Reaffirmation Celebration: Photo Slideshow

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and his wife Dr. Robin Williams greeted every University member that arrived to celebrate of the reaffirmation of DSU's accreditation during a luncheon event in the MLK Jr. Student Center.

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The DSU community gathered on Aug. 27 to celebrate the reaffirmation of the University’s accreditation earlier this summer. DSU President Harry L. Williams and Provost Alton Thompson commended the team effort that resulted in DSU meeting all 14 standards of the accreditation as well as receiving several commendations by the visiting team of evaluators representing the Middle States Commission on Higher Education. See the photo slideshow below for images from the celebration that was held in the MLK Jr. Student Center:

Tavis Smiley, Dr. Cornel West Bring Poverty Tour to DSU Sept. 13

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Tavis Smiley and Dr. Cornel West have made DSU a stop during its five-state Poverty Tour 2.0, through which they are advocating that the eradication of poverty in the U.S. become a top priority.

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Syndicated radio host and political commentator Tavis Smiley and internationally known Princeton professor Cornel West will bring their Poverty Tour 2.0 to the First State as they facilitate a town hall-style forum at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13 in the Memorial Hall Gymnasium at Delaware State University.                   Dr. Cornel West The event is free and open to the public. Delaware is one of five states – the others being Florida, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia – where Mr. Smiley and Dr. West will bring the Poverty Tour 2.0 to address the need to make the eradication of poverty the top priority in the United States. “We expect that the forthcoming census data will reveal that poverty in America is not an abstraction; too many Americans are living hand to mouth,” said Cornel West. “Basic needs such as living-wage jobs, food, clothing, medicine, and shelter cannot be ignored by the major parties during the upcoming political conventions, or by their respective nominees on the campaign trail.” The tour, which is scheduled for September 12 through the 15th will feature a number of free town hall meetings that will be broadcast live on a number of platforms including USTREAM, radio, and social media. “We are excited that Tavis Smiley and Dr. Cornel West have chosen Delaware State University as one of the sites where they will lead a discussion on the vexing problem of poverty in this country,” said Dr. Harry L. Williams, president of Delaware State University. According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, approximately 46.2 million Americans lived in poverty in 2010. This number is up from 43.6 million in 2009 and represents the fourth consecutive annual increase in this measure of poverty. The overall poverty rate of 15.1% in 2010 represents an increase from the 14.3% level in 2009. Between 2009 and 2010, the poverty rate increased for non-Hispanic Whites (from 9.4 percent to 9.9 percent), for Blacks (from 25.8 percent to 27.4 percent), and for Hispanics (from 25.3 percent to 26.6 percent). For Asians, the 2010 poverty rate (12.1 percent) was not statistically different from the 2009 poverty rate “It is our intent that in the sprint from Labor Day to Election Day, poor people do not get trampled on or left behind, Mr. Smiley said. Cornel West is a prominent and provocative democratic intellectual. He is the Class of 1943 University Professor at Princeton University. He graduated magna cum laude from Harvard in three years and obtained his M.A. and Ph.D. in philosophy at Princeton. He has taught at Union Theological Seminary, Yale, Harvard, and the University of Paris. He has written 19 books and edited 13. He is best known for his classics, Race Matters and Democracy Matters, and his new memoir, Brother West: Living and Loving Out Loud. He appears frequently on Real Time with Bill Maher, The Colbert Report, CNN, and C-SPAN, as well as on his dear brother Tavis Smiley’s PBS TV show.  He is also co-host of the popular radio show Smiley & West, heard on Public Radio International (PRI) around the country. Smiley & West is a highly-acclaimed progressive program. He made his film debut in The Matrix — and was the DVD commentator (with Ken Wilbur) on the official trilogy, released in 2004. He also has appeared in over 25 documentaries and films including Examined Life, Call & Response, Sidewalk, and STAND. He has made three spoken-word albums including Never Forget, collaborating with Prince, Jill Scott, Andre 3000, Talib Kweli, KRS-One and the late Gerald Levert. His spoken-word interludes were featured on Terence Blanchard’s Choices (which won the Grand Prix in France for the best jazz album of the year of 2009), The Cornel West Theory’s Second Rome, Raheem DeVaughn’s Love & War: Masterpiece, and most recently on Bootsy Collins’ The Funk Capital of the World. In short, Cornel West has a passion to communicate to a vast variety of publics in order to keep alive the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. — a legacy of telling the truth and bearing witness to love and justice.   Tavis Smiley Tavis Smiley is a noted television and radio talk show host, author, as well as the president and CEO of The Smiley Group, Inc. From his celebrated conversations with world figures to his work to inspire the next generation of leaders, broadcaster, author, publisher, advocate, and philanthropist Tavis Smiley has emerged as an outstanding voice for change. Smiley is currently the host of the late-night television talk show Tavis Smiley on PBS as well as The Tavis Smiley Show and Smiley & West from Public Radio International (PRI). In addition to his radio and television work, Smiley has authored 16 books. His memoir, What I Know for Sure: My Story of Growing Up in America, became a New York Times best seller, and the book he edited, Covenant with Black America, became the first nonfiction book by a Black-owned publisher to reach #1 on The New York Times’ best-sellers list. In his latest title The Rich and the Rest of Us: A Poverty Manifesto, Smiley and his co-author Dr.  Cornel West take on the “p” word — poverty.  In this game-changing book, they challenge all Americans to re-examine their assumptions about poverty in America — what it really is and how to eradicate it. Smiley is the presenter and creative force behind America I AM: The African American Imprint. This unprecedented traveling museum exhibition, which debuted in January 2009, will tour the country for four years, celebrating the extraordinary impact of African American contributions to our nation and the world, as told through rare artifacts, memorabilia, and multimedia. Smiley’s most gratifying accomplishments are rooted in his passion to inspire the next generation of leaders. The nonprofit Tavis Smiley Foundation was established to provide leadership training and development for youth. Since its inception, more than 6,000 young people have participated in the foundation’s Youth to Leaders training workshops and conferences. His communications company, The Smiley Group, Inc., is dedicated to supporting human rights and related empowerment issues and serves as the holding company for various enterprises encompassing broadcast and print media, lectures, symposiums, and the Internet. Smiley’s achievements have earned him numerous awards and honorary doctorate degrees, including one from his alma mater, Indiana University. In 2009, Indiana University named the atrium of its School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) building “The Tavis Smiley Atrium.” Smiley is also the recipient of the prestigious Du Bois Medal from Harvard University and the 2009 Interdependence Day Prize from Demos in Istanbul, Turkey.

Candy Young Named as DSU's New Athletics Director

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Candy Young receives congratulations from DSU President Harry L. Williams after he named her the new athletics director at DSU. When she assume the leadership post on Aug. 13, she will be first female ever to serve as AD at DSU.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams announced today that he has appointed Candy E. Young as Delaware State University’s new Athletics Director.   Ms. Young moves into DSU’s top athletics post after serving over the last seven months as an interim senior associate athletics director. She has also served as the senior women’s administrator for athletics since September 2010. Newly appointed AD Candy Young addresses the DSU athletics staff and coaches after being named to the post.  She is the first female to ever be appointed to that post in the history of DSU.   She first came to DSU in 2006 as the head women’s track and cross country coach, a coaching post she served in until 2010. She served as the acting athletics director for the University from March to May of 2009.   Prior to her arrival, Ms. Young served as an assistant men and women’s track coach at California State University, the University of Pittsburgh, Ohio State University, and Seton Hall University from 1992 to 2006. During her 1989-92 stint with Seton Hall, the women’s track team was the Big East Champions in 1992-93. She also served as the head coach of the USA World University team in 1997.   As a high school track star, Ms. Young set a world record in 1980 – which still stands – in the 100-meter hurdler (12.94 seconds) during her senior year at Beaver Falls High School in Pennsylvania. That same year, she earned a spot on the U.S. Olympic 100-meter hurdle team, only to be robbed of the chance to compete by the U.S. boycott of the Olympics that year in protest to the Russian invasion of Afghanistan.   She would go on to compete for Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, N.J. where she was an eight-time All-American and a world-record holder in the indoors 55-meter hurdler.   The DSU president said Ms. Young’s leadership ability has been well-demonstrated at DSU and that she will bring stability to the DSU Athletics Program. “She is committed to staying here, to building the DSU Athletics Program, and to establishing new levels of excellence,” Dr. Williams said. “As a former Olympian and a world-record holder, Ms. Young brings a set of standards to the DSU athletics that will move it to new heights.”   Ms. Young’s selection came after national search. Serving on the DSU Search Committee were Provost Alton Thompson (chair); Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement and chief of staff; Jordan Williams, interim director of the Wellness & Recreation Center; Head Bowling Coach Ricki Ellison; Dr. Charlie Wilson, chair of the Faculty Senate and associate professor of biology,.and Frank Marshall, DSU alumnus and athletics booster.   Dr. Thompson said Ms. Young brings a diversity of experience to the AD post that the DSU Athletics Program needs to be highly competitive in Division I sports. “She can identify with student athletes and provide the leadership that will result in an exceptional learning environment where they can compete at the highest level across the wide spectrum of sports,” the search committee chair said.   The provost added that the timing of the AD announcement was fitting. “We are announcing the naming of a former Olympian as our new AD at the same time that the Summer Olympics are going on in London,” Dr. Thompson noted.   Ms. Young said that she is honored that Dr. Williams and the DSU AD selection committee has chosen her to be the athletics director, and that she is excited about being named the first female AD in the history of this institution. “Our future plans are to revive the department with energetic sports programming,” Ms. Young said. “The core values of this institution will be the foundation for transforming the athletic department.”   The new AD said that consistent with being a former track athlete, she is ready to hit the ground running.   “I am a sprinter and we come out of the blocks fast; I am a hurdler and we leap tall buildings,” Ms. Young said. “As an athletics program, we are going to get to the finish line.”   Ms. Young has a Bachelor of Arts in Biological Education from Fairleigh Dickinson University, and a Master of Arts in Sports Administration from DSU.   Ms. Young, who will take over as the DSU AD effective Aug. 13, will succeed former Athletics Director Derek Carter, who stepped down in January to assume a new post with the University. Eric D. Hart, associate athletics director of Academic Services, has served since then as the interim AD.

DSU's Dr. Victor Gomia Authors Book on Development Theatre in Africa

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Dr. Victor Gomia's new book Mobilizing the Hordes: Radio Drama as Development Theater in Sub-Saharan Africa explores the use of utilitarian literature through radio drama productions in the continent.

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Dr. Victor N. Gomia, an assistant professor of English in the DSU Department of English and Foreign Languages has published a new book titled Mobilizing the Hordes: Radio Drama as Development Theater in Sub-Saharan Africa. The 296-page volume draws on rich empirical research on radio drama production in Cameroon to offer a strikingly new perspective in development theatre discourse in Africa. Chronicling the history and evolution of development theatre practice in Anglophone Africa and arguing for literary forms that address the basic everyday realities of ordinary people in a medium they understand, the book revisits the crucial question of utilitarian literature in a continent that continues to brandish a begging bowl even as it celebrates fifty years of independence. As a medium of development communication with unique aesthetic qualities found in and not limited to sound and silence, the author argues, radio drama creates events and condenses reality into dramatic constellations with a high sense of authenticity that invites its audience to participate in the creation process with a strong sense of direction in a story, a plot and a moral. This people-oriented culture re-animation process, Gomia asserts, is the fertile ground for grassroots empowerment. It is the point of departure for feasible development initiatives that the book explores. Dr. Gomia holds a Ph.D. in Postcolonial literature and an M.A in Public Administration with concentrations in non-profit and International Development. An author of numerous articles with wide interdisciplinary interest, Dr. Gomia has presented papers at national and international conferences. Prior to taking a position at Delaware State University in Fall 2011, Dr. Gomia had engaged in research and teaching at Yaounde University 1 (Cameroon), University of Bayreuth (Germany), Kentucky State University and Argosy University On-line (U.S.A). The book can be purchased from Michigan State University Press, Amazon.com and African Books Collective.

DSU's Dr. Melikechi Prepares for NASA Work after Curiosity Landing

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Dr. Noureddine Melikechi fields questions from the media about the Curiosity landing on Mars and his work on the NASA mission that will follow.

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NASA’s Curiosity Rover has landed on Mars. Now DSU’s Dr. Noureddine Melikechi will soon contribute his optics expertise as part of the Curiosity ChemCam Team and assist the space agency in analyzing the data that comes back from Mars through the rover. Culminating a 367 million-mile and 36-week flight from earth, the Curiosity Rover was lowered gently by ropes from a rocket backpack onto the Mars surface inside its Gale Crater at 1:32 a.m. EST on Monday, Aug. 6. Dr. Melikechi, who is also the dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology as well as the University’s vice president of research, showed his excitement during a morning press briefing with local media on Aug. 6. “Imagine, you build something that you can’t test, send it 570 million kilometers, and it works for the first time,” said Dr. Melikechi, referring to the complex landing technique. “I am so proud to be a part of this mission, which includes about 300 scientists – of which I am one – and thousands of engineers.” Angela Lundberg is one of two graduate assistants who will work with Dr. Melikechi in the analysis of the Mars data. He and two graduate assistants, Alissa Mezzacappa and Angela Lundberg, are part of the mission’s ChemCam Team. The ChemCam (Chemistry and Camera suite), one of 10 instruments on the Curiosity, will be used to study the soil and rocks at each place Curiosity stops. The ChemCam will shoot an infrared laser – more than a million watts of power – at rock surfaces on the planet. The resulting light will be read by the unit’s spectrometer, which is expected to provide new information concerning the rock composition of the planet. The ChemCam utilizes a technology called laser-induced spectroscopy, which has been used in determine the composition of objects in extreme environments such as nuclear reactors and on the sea floor. However, this is the first time the technology has been used in space exploration. After the Curiosity does some preliminary checks and scientific work during its early days on the planet, the ChemCam will shoot its first laser blasts in mid-August, Dr. Melikechi said. The primary goal of the Curiosity mission is to study whether the Gale Crater area of Mars has evidence of past or present habitable environments. Dr. Melikechi said the mission will be looking for the past or present existence of liquid water, the chemical elements required to sustain life, and a source of energy, all necessary elements for habitability. “It is my hope that we will see something that no one expects,” Dr. Melikechi said. Dr. Melikechi will travel later this month and again in September to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to receive the first data from the ChemCam unit. One of the first images sent to earth from Curiosity shortly after its landing on Aug. 6.   State Sen. Brian Bushweller, in attendance at the press briefing, called the landing “a big day for the nation and a big day for DSU.” “Standing shoulder to shoulder with all the others involved in the mission is DSU and its Optics Program,” Sen. Bushweller said. “DSU has given the state something to be very proud of.” This collaboration with NASA on the Mars mission is the latest accomplishment in the career of Dr. Melikechi and in the development of the Optics Program at DSU. Beginning with the establishment in 1998 of the Applied Optics Center on campus, through Dr. Melikechi’s leadership the program has attracted two $5 million research grants from the National Science Foundation in 2006 and from NASA in 2009. The two grants resulted in the establishment of a Center for Research in Education and Optical Sciences and its Applications, and the Center for Applied Optics in Space Sciences. That expansion in the Optics Program infrastructure also led to the creation of master and doctoral optics degree programs, the creation of the University first-ever intellectual property – a laser-based diagnostic device to be used in hospitals – and the attraction of $10 million in state funding for the future construction of an optics facility on campus.

U.S. Sen. Tom Carper Visits DSU to Highlight Immunizations

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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper talks about the importance of vaccinations during a Immunization Awareness event held Aug. 9 in the DSU Wellness & Recreation Center.

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U.S. Sen. Tom Carper teamed up with Delaware State University and the Delaware Division of Public Health to highlight the importance of immunizations as students prepare to go back to school this month. U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (2nd on left) chats with DSU Student Government Association executive members (l-r) Adrian Sutton, Isaiah McCoy and Darrell Gray.   The event, held at DSU's new Wellness Center, a state-of-the-art center that promotes healthy lifestyles among its students, showcased steps parents and students can take to make sure students are ready and healthy to return to school.   "Encouraging students to lead healthy lifestyles are one way parents and educators can instill good lifelong habits," said Sen. Carper. "By preventing illness, we can also decrease time away from school and work and avoid costly doctor and hospital visits. Staying on top of our immunizations is one way we can all get better health care results for less money."   "Immunizations are vital part of preventive care and Delaware has many options for no cost or low cost immunizations for children," said Dr. Karyl Rattay, Delaware Division of Public Health Director.  "Thank you to Senator Carper and Delaware State University for raising awareness that immunizations are smart medicine."     According to Marianne Carter, director of the DSU-based Delaware Center for Health Promotion, "Being up-to-date with immunizations is an essential requirement for staying healthy. It's far better to prevent illness than to treat it after the fact."     "Because a safe and healthy campus is one of our top priorities at Delaware State University, we follow the standard vaccination guidelines to ensure that our students have had or receive the recommended immunizations," said Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at DSU, which has more than 4,100 students. "Our University health officials work hard to review the immunization history of each student and require them to get any necessary vaccinations they might have missed." Michelle Fisher, director of DSU Student Health Services; Provost Alton Thompson; Dr. Martin Luta, chief of the Communicable Diseases Bureau (state Div. of Public Heath); U.S. Sen. Tom Carper; Kristin Trout. Wellness and Rec. Ctr. coordinator; and Marianne Carter, director of the Delaware Center for Health Promotions, get together after the event. According to the American College Health Association, vaccine preventable diseases continue to occur on college campus. “This creates an opportunity and challenge for colleges and universities,” said Michelle Fisher, director of the DSU Student Health Services. “It creates and opportunity to promote health and educate students on the importance of keeping their immunizations up to date, while it also creates of challenge to put practice in place to monitor immunization compliance, to keep abreast of current health care recommendations, and to regularly monitor disease trends.”   Ms. Fisher added that her health services staff at DSU does a good job at meeting those challenges.   According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, everyone age 6 months and older needs a seasonal flu shot every year. Here are some other shots people need at different ages:    Young children:  · Children under age 6 get a series of shots to protect against measles, polio, chicken pox, and hepatitis among others.   Pre-teens and teens:  · Pre-teens need shots at age 11 or 12 to help protect them from tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough, meningitis, and HPV (human papillomavirus).  · Teens need a booster shot at age 16 to help protect them from meningitis.  Adults:  · All adults need a booster shot every 10 years to protect against tetanus and diphtheria.  · People age 65 or older need a one-time pneumonia shot.  · Talk to your doctor or nurse about which shots you and your family need.

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