February 2014


Dover & Sussex classes to be held 2/3; Wilmington classes canceled

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The east side of the DSU@Wilmington looks nothing like this now, as a snow surrounds the building today and has prompted the canceling of classes tonight.

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All normal operations and classes at DSU’s Dover main campus and Georgetown site will be held as scheduled on Monday, Feb. 3, including evening classes. Individuals are urged to exercise caution when driving or walking on campus tonight.   Due to the snow storm that has hit New Castle County today, all classes for the DSU@Wilmington location have been canceled for Feb. 3.   DSU officials will continue to monitor the weather and conditions in New Castle County on Feb. 4 and will make a determination by noon on that day concerning the status of classes at the DSU@Wilmington location.  

Dr. Susmita Roye Receives NEH Award

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Dr. Susmita Roye has received the National Endowment for the Humanities grant award in support of her current book manuscript project on the women writers of India during British Rule of 1757-1947.

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Dr. Susmita Roye, associate professor of English, has been named as a recipient of the National Endowment for Humanities Award for Faculty. The award has been given in recognition and support of her current book manuscript project, which is about the women writers of India during the British rule of that country (1757-1947). She has tentatively titled the book “Mothering India.” Dr. Roye will receive financial support from the grant award, which will enable her to take some time off from teaching to finish the book. She was one of only eight persons to receive the award out of 101 applications. Previously, Dr. Roye co-edited and contributed a chapter to the book The Male Empire under The Female Gaze, which explored the perspective of British white women amid British rule of India. Dr. Roye, a native of India, has been a faculty member of DSU since 2011.

"The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" Comes to Life at DSU Mar. 5

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The critically acclaimed nonfiction book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks will come to life at Delaware State University where members of the Lacks Family will discuss the issues raised in the book during a guest speaker event at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Mar. 5 in the Education and Humanities Theater on campus. The event – which is part of the DSU Division of Student Affairs’ Make Your Mark Speaker Series – is free and open to the public. Henrietta Lacks’ daughter-in-law Shirley Lacks and her great-granddaughter Victoria Baptiste will speak at the event about the Lacks Family’s story and Henrietta Lacks’ legacy. The book by Rebecca Skloot tells the story of Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951), an African-American woman born in Roanoke, Va. and later an adult resident of Maryland.  After being diagnosed with cancer, without her knowledge she became the source of cells from her cancerous tumor that were cultured to create the first known human immortal cell line. Known as the HeLa cell line, since the 1950s it has been used for a wide variety of medical research, such as to test the first polio vaccine, numerous virus and cancer studies, the use of novel heptamethine dyes and many other projects. The book – which was selected to be DSU’s One Book, One Campus feature selection for the 2013-2014 school year – has been acclaimed for its accessible science writing and for dealing with the ethical issues of race and class in medical research.

Founders' Day at DSU -- Photo Slideshow

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(L-r) Micah Fuwiley, Carlos Holmes, Danali Olukayode, Dorian McDonald and Harry Hudson all donned late-1800s clothes and greeted folks that came to the Open House at Loockerman Hall on Feb. 25 to experience some DSU history and celebrate Founders' Day.

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Delaware State University celebrated its 123rd birthday with a birthday cake in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center and an Open House at the historic Loockerman Hall. Click on the below photo slideshow for images of Founders’ Day, followed by more information: Students, faculty and staff showed up at Loockerman Hall, where students Dorian McDonald, Harry Hudson, Danali Olukayode, Micah Fuwiley, and staff member Carlos Holmes dressed up in late 1890s garb and greet the attendees. The Open House also featured the stories of Dr. Reba Hollingsworth and Mrs. Augusta Carr-Ross, who both lived in Loockerman Hall when they were students in the 1940s.

DSU Alum to Premiere Film "16th and Philly" Feb. 11 at DSU

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Isaiah Nathanial, Class of 2004, is a former four-year Hornet basketball player, has produced a documentary film about the famed 16th Street pick-up basketball in North Philadelphia that produced a number of players who would go on to compete in college and professionally, including in the NBA and overseas leagues.

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DSU alumnus and filmmaker Isaiah Nathaniel will make his alma mater a part of the premiere tour of his new documentary 16th and Philly when it screens on campus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the Longwood Auditorium of the Bank of America Building.   The screening is free and open to the public.   Mr. Nathaniel, who also played basketball for DSU from 2000-2004, has done a documentary on the famed North Central Philadelphia Basket League – known commonly in Philly as the 16th Street League, because its outdoor courts are located on the corner of 16th Street and West Susquehanna Ave. in North Philadelphia. During its prominent years of the early 1980s to the early 2000s, it was considered one of the top pick-up leagues on the East Coast.   The league produced a number of players who went on to compete in college, overseas and in professional leagues and the NBA such as Hank Gathers, Bo Kimball, Doug Overton, Lionel Simmons, Ronald “Flip” Murray, Cuttino Mobley, Aaron “AO” Owens, Rodney “Hot Rod” Odrick and many others.   Mr. Nathaniel said the documentary was made to honor the memory and legacy of the 16th Street League and preserve some of the stories.   “Anytime people talk about basketball in Philly, there’s always some who remember and talk about the 16th Street League,” Mr. Nathaniel said. “Whether you witnessed it as a player or a spectator, it never leaves you.”   Following the film, there will be a question-and-answer period between the audience and the filmmaker.

Guest Lecture on Bio-Based Materials for Chemistry, March 6

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DSU’s 2014 Sustainable Chemistry Seminar Series will feature guest speaker Dr. Rich Chapas who will give a presentation on “Bio-based Materials for Chemical and Fuels” at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 6 in room 323, Mishoe Science Center (south) on campus. The guest lecture is free and open to the public. Dr. Chapas currently runs a consulting business, through which he has worked with startup companies such as H2OPE Biofuels, for which he served as chief executive officer. He is also an educator whose teaching experience includes strategy, technology transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship, sustainability and green business, which he teaches at the University of Delaware. He has a breadth of experience in developing and commercializing new products. His patent portfolio includes products that are generating over $30 million in sales. His technical and business expertise includes bio-based materials, polymer chemistry, nonwovens, composites, adhesives, and absorbent materials.

DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman Gives Corporate Wisdom during DSU Visit

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman discussed wide range of corporate topics during a 40-minute Open Forum before a packed Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building.

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Ellen Kullman shared how she worked her way up through the ranks of DuPont to become its CEO. Ellen Kullman, CEO of DuPont and the chair of its Board of Directors, and DSU President Harry L. Williams engaged in a dialogue during a Feb. 11 Open Forum on the current emphasis of Delaware’s largest private employer, the importance of connecting science with the marketplace, and the important skills needed to work for the company. The discussion took place on stage in the Bank of America Building’s Longwood Auditorium before a standing-room-only crowd of students and faculty. As the DuPont CEO since 2009, Ms. Kullman is the 19th executive to lead the company since DuPont was founded in 1802. In overseeing the science company – which has 66,000 employees worldwide – Ms. Kullman has been ranked as #3 among the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" by Fortune magazine, and also was named one of the 50 "World’s Most Powerful Women" by Forbes magazine. Prior to the Open Forum, Ms. Kullman paid a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center where she spoke with student and faculty scientists about the 14 research projects that were on display there in poster presentations. “It was very exciting to see these research projects,” Ms. Kullman said. “I enjoyed the passion that the researchers had for what they are doing.” The DuPont CEO shared that she is a native of Wilmington. After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, she worked for Westinghouse and General Electric before joining  DuPont in 1988. On the way to DuPont, she earned a Master of Business Administration degree. In noting that DuPont is a market-driven global science company, Dr. Williams asked the CEO how DuPont “connects the dots” from science to the market. Ms. Kullman said that in the past, DuPont operated under the principal that if the company created the product, the marketplace would come. “Now we spend a lot of time creating cross-sectional teams that work to bring science and engineering to the market,” she said. “If we don’t connect the dots from our science to the market, we won’t be successful.” Ellen Kullman listens to Rita-Kusi Appiah, a plant science graduate student, who explains her epigenetics research. The CEO noted that DuPont has established 12 Innovation Centers around the world, which are places for scientists, marketers and customers to come together and talk about what can be. “It has globalized our company,” she said. Ms. Kullman said in order to stay relevant and successful, DuPont has had to “give up the past, look to the future and do it strategically.” In doing so, DuPont has let go of its longtime traditional paint products operation and also announced plans to spin-off its chemical division to become a standalone operation. “I ran one of those businesses, so it was hard,” Ms. Kullman said. “But at the end of the day, I had to think of the greater whole.” She said because it is a science company, innovation is essential. “If we stop being an innovator, we will stop growing,” she said. “If we make our customers more successful, then we will be more successful.” When Dr. Williams asked her if DuPont would support a public-private partnership to train scientists for the new agriculture revolution, Ms. Kullman said while DuPont believes such partnerships are important, it is equally important for the goals to be aligned. “It has got to be set up for the right kind of success,” she said. “It is more than just giving money, but the money should go to something that you value and that we value.” Ms. Kullman talked about the importance of  how leaders communicate. “I have learned that the consistency of message is important,” she said. “I have learned I need to spend 50 percent more time on communications than I would naturally do.” In talking about the skills DuPont is looking for in college graduates, she said the areas of finance, accounting, marketing, sales, engineering and science research are disciplines important to the company. But she also noted that students should become adept at soft skills. “With the interns we get, I am always interested in learning if they can work as a team,” Ms. Kullman said. “You have to work with people, and for that reason soft skills are important.” She also stressed the importance of finding good mentors. “Mentors helped me understand  my self-awareness, how I come across to people,” Ms. Kullman said. “I think you need to seek out people who will tell you the truth.”

DSU Resident Director Authors MACUHO article on Positivity

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The article "The Power of Positivity" by DSU's Brandy Garlic -- printed in its entirety below as it appears in MACUHO Magazine -- is a message of great value for everyone on campus and beyond.

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Brandy Garlic, the resident director of University Village Apartment, authored the below article on page 32 in the Winter Issue of MACUHO Magazine, a publication of the Mid-Atlantic Association of College & University Housing Officers. At first, the plan for this webpage was to simply mention her authorship of the piece and summarize its message. However, after reading it, it became clear that it was a message that every member of the DSU community – students, staff, faculty, administrators, alumni and anyone else who takes the time to read it – could and would benefit from it. So the article has been reproduced below in its entirety. The University Village Residential Education staff appears on the front cover of the Winter Issue of MACHUHO THE POWER OF POSITIVITY Brandy Garlic, Resident Director University Village Apartments, Delaware State University             Let’s be honest. Working in housing and residential education is a lot of work! There is so much emphasis on customer service, office hours, on call, late nights, policies and procedures that sometimes we forget the bare essentials that we need to get to the meat of the job done. I am a firm believer (and I preach this to my students and staff) that, “your attitude determines the outcome.” If you approach the Resident Assistant position  and a career in general with a negative attitude, then you will have  negative results. If you approach an irate student with negativity, you had better believe that you will get negative results. There truly is power in positivity.            Brandy Garlic             This may seem like mere words to you, but it has become a movement on Delaware State University’s campus specifically in the Department of Housing and Residential Education. While planning for fall training this year, I brainstormed a great deal trying to find a theme. Just like most of my “great ideas,” it came to me at 2 a.m. while trying to fall asleep. Positivity!             During my welcome and expectations sessions, I told the RAs, “I do not do well with negativity because I am a positive person. So, if you are having a bad day, and I encounter you, I will sprinkle you with positivity. Smiles are contagious and so is a positive attitude and aura.” To support my thinking and my way of living I showed a TED Talk, “The Happy Secret to Better Work” by Shawn Achor. Shawn’s talk is about positive psychology. He challenges listeners to not allow their external world to determine their happiness.             “If you raise someone’s level of positivity in the present then their brain experiences what we call a happiness advantage,” says Achor. He does a fantastic job of exuding the positivity and energy he discusses in his talk. The feedback from the RAs after hearing this was filled with positivity.             Because of this new way of approaching training, this positive movement, you could see the difference in the way the RAs bonded with their staffs, the way they learned new policies and procedures, and the way they accepted the challenges of training. This may sound like something small, not anything new to professionals or even Chief Housing Officers, but it is something that we as humans sometimes take for granted. Reintroducing positivity to the RAs during training produced powerful results and provided an amazing atmosphere. Anytime they are faced with adversity in life or in the job I challenge them to “sprinkle it with positivity.” I tell them that I don’t care if it’s a salt shaker filled with positivity or a bucket. Sprinkle it with positivity because your attitude in just about any situation can determine the outcome.

Several DSU Events Postponed Due to Forecasted Winter Storm

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Due to a winter snowstorm that is forecasted for the entire state of Delaware beginning on late Wednesday evening (tonight) and throughout the day on Thursday, Delaware State University has postponed the following events on campus: The Founder’s Day events originally scheduled from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the MLK Student Center and at Loockerman Hall is rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 25.  The Make Your Mark Guest Speakers Series event on the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the E&H Theatre. The Hornet Days events on campus from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. The rescheduled dates for the above events will be announced later. The DSU Administration has not yet made a decision on the status of University operations for Thursday, Feb. 13. It is expected that a decision will be made by late Wednesday evening (sometime after 10:30 p.m.) and publicized on all University communication channels (website, email, DSU Snowline). 

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