February 2010


DSU Chinese Students/Scholars to Celebrate Chinese New Year Feb. 14

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The Red Sorghum Dancing Group will be one of the performing acts at the Feb. 14 DSUCSSA's Chinese New Year celebration.

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  The Chinese Students Association of Delaware State University will host the 2010 Chinese New Year Celebration from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 14 in the DSU Education and Humanities Theatre on campus. The event is free and open to the public. Professional and talented performers will present traditional Chinese music, ethnic dancing, martial arts, a Chinese zither recital and a traditional comic show. Chinese New Year or Spring Festival is the most significant festival for the Chinese people as it is that time of the year when all family members get together to have a gala time, just like Christmas in the West. The festival traditionally begins on the first day of the first month in the Chinese calendar and ends on the 15th; this day is called Lantern Festival. Chinese New Year's Eve is known as Chúxī. It literally means "Year-pass Eve". In 2010, Chinese New Year is Feb.14 (the same day as Valentine's Day), but every year, this date is changing. Chinese Zodiac is named for the 12 animals that are the rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig, 2009 is the Year of Ox and 2010 will be the Year of Tiger.    

DSU to Present the Jena Production "America, Amerique" at the Schwartz

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The March 4 performance of the America, Amerique cast (left) is a rescheduled date, as the original Feb. 12 date was postponed due to the snowstorm of that week.

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  Delaware State University will host the JENA Company production entitled America, Amerique at 7 p.m. Friday, March 4 at the Schwartz Center for the Arts in Downtown Dover. Live on stage, America, Amerique is the story of American immigrants – and America – 1845 to the Present. From the Irish potato fields to Mid-western farms and New York tenements … from New England factories and the railroad across the Rockie, to the Mexican border 2008…and elsewhere. The startling and extraordinary production uses music, sound, and seven actors to bring the audience to unknown worlds. “Voices from Our Past, Dreams for the Future, and a Battle that still rages today, the audience will learn, to know deeply, where we’ve been, where we’ve come from, maybe even where we’re going, in this American story, the story of immigrants. The production is free to students with I.D. and is open to the public with a $10 fee for adults. For tickets call the Schwartz Center for the Arts box office at (302) 678-5152. For further information contact Dr. Donald Parks at (302) 678-3583 or e-mail at Donald@schwartzcenter.com. School groups and other community groups are welcome to participate in this opportunity to learn about the history of immigration in America.      

DSU Music Dept. Hosts 2nd Annual Brass Day

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This year's Brass Day will feature an afternoon performance of the U.S. Naval Brass Quintet and an evening concert of  the Rodney Mack Philadelphia Big Brass.

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  The Delaware State University Music Department will hold its second annual Brass Day that will feature clinics and performance opportunities for brass musicians of all ages as well as be highlighted by three separate concerts by a number of DSU Brass Ensemble groups, the U.S. Naval Band Brass Quintet and the Rodney Mack Philadelphia Big Brass, all taking place throughout the day on Friday, Feb. 12 in the Education and Humanities Building and Theatre. The day will begin at 12 noon with a concert featuring all of DSU’s brass groups – the DSU Trombone Ensemble, the Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, the “Sting” Brass Quintet, the “Valve” Brass Quintet, as well as DSU faculty members Dr. Patrick Hoffman and Dr. Frank Gazda.   That will be followed by a 1 p.m. clinics/reading session for trumpet, horn, trombone, baritone/euphonium and tuba. These sessions are open to all participants    At 2 p.m. the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) Band Brass Quintet will perform a concert in the Education and Humanities Theatre. The USNA Band Brass Quintet, which is dedicated to the promotion of traditional and contemporary brass quintet literature, is based in the Annapolis area where it has been widely hailed as clinicians by schools and colleges of that area. This concert is free and open to the public.   The DSU Trombone Ensemble -- (l-r) James Scarborough, Ashton Haines, Shawn Walker, Dr. Frank Gazda (director), Ruben Fountain and Janae Huff -- will be one of several DSU Brass Ensembles to perform during the Brass Day event. At 7:15 p.m. there will be a prelude concert featuring the DSU Brass Ensembles and the “Mass Brass” Ensemble.   At 8 p.m. the Rodney Mack Philadelphia Big Brass will perform the feature concert of the day. The band is composed of some of America’s top brass musicians, with member of the group having been performers with elite symphony musicians such as the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Symphony, Sào Paulo State Symphony Orchestra, Imani Winds, Canadian Brass and the Boston Brass. The bandleader Rodney Mack is a cousin of renowned jazz trumpet player Wynton Marsalis.   The Rodney Mack Concert, which will also be held in the Education & Humanities Theatre, will cost $5 for student and $10 for adults.   All of the day’s events will take place in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus. Students (DSU and non-DSU) of all ages, amateur and professional brass players, and all music lovers are welcome for a day of clinics, workshops, and concerts.   With the exception of Rodney Mack concert, all other activities are free and open to the public.  Please contact Frank Gazda at (302) 857-7885 or fgazda@desu.edu for directions or additional information.      

President Williams Attends Obama's HBCU Event

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DSU President Harry L. Williams, shown on Feb. 1 with Dr. John S. Wilson Jr. (r) of the White House Initiative on HBCUs, was reunited with the administration official at the Feb. 26 executive order signing by President Barack Obama that promises support for HBCUs.

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  DSU President Harry Lee Williams spent Feb. 26 in Washington, D.C. with other HBCU leaders to witness President Barack Obama’s signing of an executive order that renews the White House’s commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The executive order renews White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities that was begun in 2002 under the administration of President George Bush. According to a White House press release, the event – which took place in the White House East Room – demonstrates President’s Obama’s strong appreciation for the historic role these institutions have played in the education of citizens as well as the Administration’s commitment to assist HBCUs in accomplishing their missions.   Specifically, the executive order establishes the White House Initiative on HBCUs to be housed in the U.S. Department of Education under the leadership of Executive Director John S. Wilson Jr., as well as establish a President’s Board of Advisors in HBCUs.   Dr. Wilson was in attendance at DSU when Dr. Williams announced that establishment of a Blue Ribbon Commission to create a new vision and set of core values for the University. He also met that same day with the DSU president and commission members to explain President Obama’s commitment to HBCUs.   DSU President Williams said that it was a tremendous experience to attend President Obama’s executive order signing along with the entire Congressional Black Caucus and more then 40 other HBCU presidents.   “President Obama made it clear that he is in full support of HBCUs,” said the DSU president. “He cited the importance of the sustainability of HBCUs because it is going to be important of his 2020 goal of improving the number of people earning degrees.   Dr. Williams added that President Obama has requested $98 million in new money for HBCUs, with a large percentage of that going toward financial aid for students and increasing the Pell Grant.   According the White House press release, the Obama Administration is also requesting $20.5 million for a HBCU Capital Financing Program. This would provide HBCUs with access to financing for the repair, renovation and construction or acquisition of education facilities, instructional equipment, research instrumentation and physical infrastructure.   Including Delaware State University, there are 105 HBCUs located in 20 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands, which serve more than 300,000 undergraduate and graduate students.  

DSU to Host "America Amerique" at the Schwartz

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The cast of America Amerique (left) will perform at the Schwartz Center for the Arts in Downtown Dover on Feb. 12.

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  Delaware State University will host the JENA Company production entitled America Amerique at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 4 at the Schwartz Center for the Arts in downtown Dover. The March 4 performance is a rescheduling from the original Feb. 12 date that had to be postponed due to the snowstorm that week. Live on stage, AMERICA AMERIQUE is the story of American immigrants – and America – 1845 to the Present. From the Irish potato fields to Mid-western farms and New York tenements … from New England factories and the railroad across the Rockie, to the Mexican border 2008…and elsewhere. The startling and extraordinary production uses music, sound, and seven actors to bring the audience to unknown worlds. “Voices from Our Past, Dreams for the Future, and a Battle that still rages today, the audience will learn, to know deeply, where we’ve been, where we’ve come from, maybe even where we’re going, in this American story, the story of immigrants. The production is free to students with I.D. and is open to the public with a $10 fee for adults. For tickets call the Schwartz Center for the Arts box office at (302) 678-5152. For further information contact Dr. Donald Parks at (302) 678-3583 or e-mail at Donald@schwartzcenter.com. School groups and other community groups are welcome to participate in this opportunity to learn about the history of immigration in America.  

Student Center Complex Dedication still on for Feb. 25

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Even if snow surrounds the MLK Student Center on Feb. 25, the rescheduled 3 p.m. Dedication Ceremony there will still go on as planned.

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Watch the dedication live! Click here. Even if snow comes, the Student Center Complex Dedication will go on as planned at 3 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 25 in the new Martin Luther King Student Center. The public is welcome to attend the Dedication Ceremony and tours of the Student Center Complex on that rescheduled date. The Honorable Walter Fauntroy, civil right activist and former U.S. congressman, has readjusted his schedule and will give the keynote address. All other originally planned events relating to the dedication will take place on Feb. 25. With the dedication of the Complex – which includes the Strength & Conditioning Facility, the Wellness & Recreation Center with its connected swimming pool, as well as the MLK Student Center, DSU is combining the christening event with its annual observances of Martin Luther King’s Birthday and the University’s Founders’ Day. There will also be remarks from DSU President Harry Lee Williams; Kathleen Charlot, current DSU Student Government Association (SGA) president; Leroy Tate, Delaware State College alumnus and the 1968 SGA president; and Dr. Claibourne Smith, chairman of the DSU Board of Trustees. A ribbon cutting ceremony and the opening of the 1968 Time Capsule that was extracted from the cornerstone of the previous student center prior to its demolition will be other features. The University will also announce the contents of a new time capsule that will be encased in the cornerstone of the new MLK Student Center. In addition, the University will give people a chance to own a piece of history through the sale of bricks from the previous MLK Student Center that was in existence from 1968-2008. The limited edition bricks will be on sale for $15 each in the new MLK Student Center.

Two DSU Students Work with NBC at the Olympics

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Mass Communications majors Shanae Newman (l) and Kevin Davis are representing DSU with their work ethic at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver.

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  Delaware State University is once again making its mark at the World Olympics. Almost two years after four DSU mass communications students spent an internship working at the Summer Olympics in China, now there are two other students from the same department who are currently assisting with the media production at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. The two mass communications students – Kevin P. Davis, a junior television production major, and Shanae M. Newman, a senior broadcast journalism major – are getting valuable real world experience in their chosen professional vocations as a part of the NBC production team at the Olympics. Mr. Davis is working as a “logger,” in which he will review all of the NBC footage that comes into the International Broadcast Center and assign time codes on them. “This will give me an insight to the whole spectrum of what NBC is doing at the Olympic,” said Mr. Davis, native of Wichita Falls, Tex. and now a Dover resident. “Even though it is an internship position, it is important to the overall success of the production.” Ms. Newman will be working with different producers and production team members as a “runner.” The Baltimore native said that she will be there to do whatever is needed to be done. “I will get to see how the broadcasters prepare before they go on the air,” Ms. Newman said. “I will also get to see how the productions are set up.” Equally valuable, both said, will be the opportunity to work side by side with the NBC production team members and hopefully develop professional relationships that could be beneficial to their future careers.  

Dr. Claibourne D. Smith Receives Reappointment to the Board

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  Gov. Jack Markell has reappointed Dr. Claibourne D. Smith to another six years as a member of Delaware State University's Board of Trustees. Dr. Smith has been a governor’s appointee to the board since 1987, when he was first appointed to finish the term of former board member Arthur Richardson. In 1993, Dr. Smith was elected by the board to serve as chairman, which he            Dr. Claibourne D. Smith served until 2008, when he stepped down to serve as the acting president of the University.   When Dr. Harry Lee Williams became DSU’s 10th president on Jan. 10, Dr. Smith returned to the board and was re-elected as board chairman. With the governor’s reappointment, Dr. Smith is now in his 22nd year as a board member and his 16th year as board chairman.   A chemist by profession, Dr. Smith retired in 1998 from DuPont as the vice president of technology and vice chairman of Corporate Education. The Centerville, Del. resident has also previously served on the Delaware State Board of Education, the State Commission on Higher Education, as well as president of the Delaware Math and Science Foundation.          

DSU President and Wife Received Warmly by Civic Leaders

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First Lady Dr. Robin Williams and her husband DSU President Harry Williams receive a welcome dance from the Sankofa African Dance Company during a reception by Dover-area civic leaders.

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  DSU President Harry Lee Williams and his wife Dr. Robin S. Williams received a warm reception from a group of Dover-area civic leaders at a Feb. 18 gathering at the Kirkwood Community Center and made clear their commitment to become an active part of the community and to “transform” the University into a premier institution. The event began with a reception line in which the Williams got acquainted with each attendee one-on-one and learned about each one’s civic and professional roles in the community.   The emcee Dr. Donald A. Blakey – an alumnus of the University – then seated the DSU president and his wife in two large African-style wicker chairs, where they received a rhythmic welcome through a performance by Sankofa African Dance Company. Reuben Salters (2nd from left), founder of the Inner City Cultural League, introduced Roxie Carter (l), president of the Central Delaware NAACP, to DSU new First Couple -- Dr. Robin S. Williams and Dr. Harry L. Williams.   Dr. Robin Williams – who is currently concluding her tenure as an associate dean at North Carolina Central University and will be soon joining her husband permanently at DSU – traveled from Durham, N.C. to join her husband at the event.   “I was going to be here at this gathering whether there was one person here or many, because I want to be a part of the community,” DSU’s new First Lady said.   President Williams then spoke to the group, sharing how as a couple he and his wife stayed on one accord concerning their professional aspirations and made it a priority to be mutually supportive of each other’s careers and achievements.   The President also shared the role that his faith played in pursuing the top post of the University, and how it has given him the strong belief that he has been placed at DSU for a purpose.   “We are going to transform DSU,” President Williams said. ”It’s going to be a university that will move to a whole new level.   The President told the gathering he has established a Blue Ribbon Commission to create a new vision for the University, and added that public forums will be held through the state to obtain the ideas and perspectives from community members concerning DSU’s future direction.   “It is important to create a vision, because if you have no vision, you perish,” Dr. Williams said. “We are going to set a vision that is going to set us on a course, and that will maintain and sustain our institution.”   President Williams said community’s support is vitally important.   “We need for you to talk about DSU in a positive way, because there are a lot of positive things happening on our campus,” the DSU president said. He added that DSU has survived for 119 years and because people in Delaware have believed in the institution.   I am delighted to be here, I am excited about the challenges we are going face,” Dr. Williams said. “I know we are going to win, I just know it.”   Among the attendees were Dover City Council members Rueben Salters and Sophia R. Russell, Bishop Thomas Holsey of the Institutional Church of God in Christ, Harold Stafford, president of the Inner City Cultural League, Rev. Rita Paige and her sister Dr. Wilma Mishoe, the daughters of former DSU President Luna I. Mishoe, Roxie Carter, president of the Central Delaware Branch of the NAACP, Marian Harris, founder and executive director of the House of Pride and many others    

Rotaract Club Established on Campus

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(L-r) Kemal Atkins, interim vice president of DSU Student Affairs, Debbie Taylor and Fran Johnson, both of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary; and the DSU Rotaract officers: Charles Eke, president, Jamel Smiley, vice president, Terrell Davis, treasurer, and Yeshi Asseged, secretary stand together to display the DSU Rotaract Charter.
 

 

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  A group of DSU students have joined to establish a Rotaract Club of Delaware State University under the sponsorship and guidance of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary Club.  Representatives of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary presented the DSU Rotaract Club with its inaugural charter at a Feb. 19 ceremony in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center.   Rotaract – which stands for Rotary-In-Action – is a program of Rotary International for men and women aged 18-30. Rotaract clubs work under the guidance of their local Rotary Club in sponsoring and seeking to foster leadership, responsible citizenship, high ethical standards, international peace and understanding.   The DSU Rotaract Club is led by Charles Eke, president, Jamel Smiley, vice president, Terrell Davis, treasurer, and Yeshi Asseged, secretary. There are currently 15 members, according to Mr. Eke.   “We plan to focus on literacy and work to reach out to children,” Mr. Eke said.   The group was started under the encouragement of DSU Board of Trustees member Jose Echeverrí and DSU’s Office of Student Affairs.   There are more than 8,000 Rotaract clubs in the world, and in some locations Rotaract is growing faster than Rotary, according to Fran Johnson, president of the Camden-Wyoming Rotary.  

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