October 2012


DSU Arts Center/Gallery Features Works of Lydia Thompson

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Delaware State University will feature an exhibition of unique ceramic sculptures by Lydia Thompson entitled Roots, Connections and Pathways from Oct. 4 to Nov. 9, in the Arts Center/Gallery in the William C. Jason Library on campus.   The exhibition and the below mentioned discussion and reception are all free and open to the public.   Ms. Thompson – an Ohio native who is the chair of the Art Department at the Mississippi State University – is displaying a 14-piece exhibition that is a combination of ceramic sculptures and collage works. She will be on the DSU campus from Oct. 16-19 and will add an onsite installation piece to the exhibition at that time.   Artist Lydia Thompson’s current research investigates various geographic landscapes and how natural resources impact culture and social practices in the surrounding communities. Lydia Thompson's ceramic, wood and paint work "Return 360, Nesting" is one of pieces on display in her current exhibition in the Arts Center/Gallery.   Ms. Thompson’s show reflects an examination of organic formations. The artist notes that the presenting artwork is also a reminder of the physical process of reduction made by nature; animals and human beings create pathways that define migration patterns.    “Agricultural objects in my work speak subtly to the notion of valued commodities, which determine also insights into one’s cultural traditions,” Ms. Thompson said.   A combination gallery discussion and reception will be held with the artist on Oct. 18 in the Arts Center/Gallery. The gallery discussion will take place at 4 p.m.; the reception will be held from 5-6 p.m.   During her time at DSU, Ms. Thompson, will present a guest lecture to DSU Department of Art students and provide some critiques of their works.   The DSU Arts Center/Gallery – which is located inside the main entrance of the William C. Jason Library – is open from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

2012 Parent's Day Luncheon -- Photo Slideshow

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DSU President Harry L. Williams talks to a student and his mother during the Oct. 13 Parents Day luncheon.

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DSU held its annual Parents Day on Oct. 13 with more than 400 moms and dads attending the event on campus. During an opening session, the parents heard about the latest development at DSU from University President Harry L. Williams, as well as remarks from other DSU officials. The parents then took advantage of morning workshops on financial planning for college, the University’s Health Services, and DSU Career Services. The parents than attended a luncheon in the MLK Student Center. Many also attended DSU’s victorious 31-10 game against South Carolina State University. For images from the Parents Day luncheon, click on the below photo slideshow:

Mr. and Miss DSU Coronation -- Photo Slide Show

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The 2012-13 Royal Renaissance -- (l-r) Mr. & Miss Sophomore Quira Parker and James Jones, Mr. and Miss Junior Dejon P. Stokes and Charles Robinson-Snead,  Mr. & Miss DSU Jamesa McDonald and Eric Brown Jr., and Mr. & Miss Senior Master Brown and Serenity Goodridge.

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Delaware State University kicked off Homecoming Week with its Oct. 14 coronation of Eric Brown Jr. and Jamesa McDonald as the 2012-13 Mr. and Miss DSU. The campus king and queen were crowned during the annual Coronation Ceremony, held under this year’s theme of “Harlem Nights” in the Education & Humanities Theatre. For images from the coronation, click on the below photo slideshow, which is followed by information on the new campus king and queen. Eric J, Brown Jr., of Felton, Del., is a senior mass communication major with a 3.6 GPA, who is focusing on public relations and advertising. His career aspiration is to be a technical communicator. Mr. Brown said as Mr. DSU he hopes to inspire the student body to be the “change” that they want to see. “Often people look to leaders to implement positive change,” Mr. Browns said. “Imagine what can be accomplished if everyone decided to be that change.” Jamesa A. McDonald, of Temple Hills, Md., is a senior political science major with a 3.6 GPA, whose aspiration is to be a lobbyist/advocate for children. Ms. McDonald said that the reconstruction of the mind, body and soul will be her platform as Miss DSU. “Concerning the mind, I want to focus on empowering people and inspiring them to have confidence. With the body, I want to focus on heart disease because it is the #1 killer among African American women,” Ms. McDonald said. “And concerning the soul, I will promote having intense pride this historically black university. The Royal Renaissance Court also included: Mr. and Miss Sophomore, James Jones and Quira A. Parker Mr. and Miss Junior, Charles R. Robinson-Snead and Dejon P. Stokes Mr. and Miss Senior, Master L. Brown and Serenity E. Goodridge Little Mr. and Miss DSU, Jordan Davis and Qira Hutchens  

DSU Speaks to Wm Henry Middle School Students about Success

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DSU President Harry L. Williams paid a visit to 5th and 6th graders of William Henry Middle School on October 18, 2012. He spoke about his experience-based keys of success.
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DSU President Harry L. Williams shares some important things he learned as a child with the 5th and 6th graders of William Henry Middle School in Dover during an Oct. 18 presentation.

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DSU President Harry L. Williams paid a visit to the 5th and 6th graders of William Henry Middle School on Oct. 18 to give them his experience-based keys of success. DSU President Harry L. Williams speaks with students after his Oct. 18 presentation at William Henry Middle School of Dover. Dr. Williams told two separate assemblies about the vital lessons he learned as a middle school student in North Carolina, giving them the wisdom he learned about the importance of listening, obedience, being persistent, and in believing in future success. The DSU president’s presentation was part of the “You Are Somebody”” campaign by the school’s Parent Teacher Organization.

DSU Breaks Ground for New Optics Research Building

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A new state-of-the-art Optical Science Center for Applied Research building was announced.
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A new state-of-the-art Optical Science Center for Applied Research building was announced.

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Delaware State University and Gov. Jack Markell launched DSU’s newest construction project during a groundbreaking ceremony today for the future Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR) Building.   The four-story 70,000 square foot building will be the new home of DSU’s prolific Optics Program, which since 2006 has been the recipient of $23 million in research grants, produced the University’s to first two intellectual properties, and is currently involved with NASA in its current Mars Curiosity Rover mission.   DSU President Harry L. Williams said the future OSCAR Building is reflective of the University’s current direction in striving to become the top historically black university in the country.   “Our optics research has already distinguished itself as a stellar program, and it needs a facility that will not only adequately accommodate its current work, but also provide the infrastructure environment that will facilitate the future expansion of it,” Dr. Williams said. “The new building will provide the state-of-the-art facility that our premier scientists need to complement the research breakthrough capabilities they possess.” Gov. Jack Markell said that the new Optics Building will be an investment in the future of the state.   The future building was made possible initially by the support of Gov. Markell, who earmarked $10 million in the fiscal 2012 budget for the project.   “By investing in this project, we are investing in the future of our state,” said Gov. Markell. “Students are gaining the great potential to learn cutting edge science and technology for the jobs of tomorrow.  Strong universities will give us the educated workforce we need for the future, and further strengthen Delaware as an attractive place for innovative businesses.”   Gov. Markell added that the Delaware General Assembly also deserves credit for its support for the future building, as it approved the $10 million toward the project in the fiscal 2012 budget.   The Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR) Building will be located next to the Village Café on the southeast quadrant of the campus, and will highly visible to the public from DuPont Highway, which runs along the east side of the University. The building – which will be built in three phases – will be consistent with the University’s environmental stewardship efforts and its commitment to be a part of the Obama Administration’s Better Building initiative. Toward those goals, the OSCAR Building will be designed to be economic in its long-term energy usage through the installation of radiant cooling and heating systems.   Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, founder of the DSU Optics Program, said that science and innovation can and should work together for the benefit of all citizens, including Delawareans. He said the OSCAR Building will facilitate that.   “This building is an inspirational facility that allows world class scientists and innovators to create knowledge and technological products and train students in STEM fields that have a large impact on many aspects of life," said Dr. Melikechi, who is also the dean of the DSU College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology, and the University’s vice president of research.   The initial 27,000 square foot first phase will house state-of-the-art advanced optical research laboratories. A suite of shared laboratories will provide advanced technology testing and instrumentation to support a myriad of research needs. The OSCAR Building will provide for the full spectrum of research needs including wet chemistry, nanochemistry, conventional and confocal microscopy, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopy, as well as a complete image analysis suite.   The full 70,000 square foot building will add the capability of expanded optical laboratories, computational laboratories, class 100/1000 clean rooms, expanded office areas and a 150-seat auditorium-style classroom. In its design to promote scholarly interaction, interdisciplinary research and innovation, the building will also include open interaction spaces, meeting rooms and offices, a multipurpose meeting space and departmental offices. (From l-r) Optics doctoral student Julie Sejour, Provost Alton Thompson, DSU President Harry L. Williams, DSU Board of Trustees Chairman Claibourne Smith and Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, take part in the symbolic groundbreaking for the future Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR) Building.                      

Delta Sigma Theta Wins DSU's First-Ever Divine 9 Challenge

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DSU President Harry L. Williams honors the ladies of Delta Sigma Theta during halftime of the Oct. 20 homecoming game. The sorority won the University's first-ever Divine 9 Challenge and raised $1,505 to go toward scholarships for DSU students.

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DSU has recently concluded its Divine 9 Challenge, and Delta Sigma Theta came out on top as the winner. The ladies of Delta Sigma Theta received the most votes on the online-based challenged and raised the highest dollar amount for scholarships -- $1,505. DSU’s first-ever Divine 9 Challenge engaged fraternities and sororities in a friendly competition to raise scholarship dollars for DSU students. The online voting and giving took place from Oct. 12-18. The Divine 9 Challenge raised a total of $3,580 and attracted 42 first-time donors to the University. In addition to being recognized by DSU President Harry L. Williams at the Oct. 20 Homecoming football game, Delta Sigma Theta will also receive special recognition during the Dec. 7 President’s Scholarship Ball. Alpha Kappa Alpha came in second place and Kappa Alpha Psi came in third in the Divine 9 Challenge.

DSU to Resume Classes and Normal Operations Wednesday, Oct. 31

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Faculty will observe a flexible attendance policy on Oct. 31 for students unable to return to campus on Wednesday.

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Delaware State University will resume the operations of its offices and campus services on Wednesday, Oct. 31. All employees are expected to report for duty at their regular arrival times. Dr. Alton Thompson, provost and vice president of Academic Affairs, announced that classes will resume at Delaware State University (Dover, Wilmington and Georgetown) at 8 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31.  All faculty members are expected to hold classes beginning at that time.  Given the weather-related conditions in the surrounding areas, faculty members will observe a flexible attendance policy Wednesday, Oct. 31 for students unable to get to campus.   Additionally, the Oct. 31 deadline to drop a class, has been extended to Monday, Nov. 5 due to the Hurricane Sandy storm event. Drop slips – signed by the professor/instructor – must be turned into the Office of the Registrar by the end of the business day (4:30 p.m.) on Nov. 5.    Pre-registration will also be extended for one week, from Nov. 21 to Nov. 28.   The University's Emergency Management Team, which has met regularly over the past five days to prepare and respond to storm related issues, expresses its thanks to all on campus who helped to feed and protect students and maintain essential operations through this challenging time. Thanks also go to students, who approached the storm in a safe and responsible way.     Please note that some area roadways around campus may be affected by the storm.  Please use caution and plan for a little extra commuting time.   Posted at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 30

Ultrafast Optics Expert Dr. Anthony Johnson to Speak at DSU Nov. 8

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       Dr. Anthony M. Johnson Delaware State University will present Dr. Anthony M. Johnson in guest lecture on “Ultrafast Optics and Optoelectronics” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in Room 223 of the Mishoe Center (south bldg.).   The guest lecture, which is part of the Dean’s Distinguished Lecturer Series of the DSU College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology, is free and open to the public.   Dr. Anthony M. Johnson is a professor of physics, a professor of Computer Science & Electrical Engineering, and is the director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research at the University of Maryland in Baltimore County, Md.   His research pursuits include the general area of ultrafast photophysics nonlinear optical properties of bulk, nanoclustered and quantum well semiconductor structures, ultra-short pulse propagation in fibers, as well as high-speed lightwave systems.   Dr. Johnson has four United States patents, and has authored two book chapters and articles in 70 refereed publications

DSU to Feature Guest Lecture Oct. 9 on Sustainable Chemistry

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Jennifer Kmiec, executive director of the Delaware Sustainable Chemistry Alliance. Delaware State University will feature a guest lecture on “Sustainable Chemistry” presented by Jennifer Kmiec, a prominent advocate of environmentally responsible chemistry in Delaware, at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9 in the Mishoe Science Center north auditorium (rm. 139) on campus.   The guest lecture is free and open to the public.   Mrs. Kmiec, the executive director of the Delaware Sustainable Chemistry Alliance (DESCA), will explain the concept of sustainable chemistry and its importance to Delaware, as well as how the First State is a major player in this environmental endeavor.   She is also the wife of Dr. Eric Kmiec, chair of the DSU Department of Chemistry.   Sustainable chemistry – also known as “green chemistry” – is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies to the entire life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, and use.   DESCA is dedicated to encouraging sustainable innovation in chemistry throughout the greater Delaware region. Formed in 2010, DESCA's mission is to foster sustainable chemistry innovation among key stakeholders in the public and private sectors.   Working with thought leaders in industry, government and academia, DESCA helps link resources in ways that can both optimize the funding essential for R&D and translate the benefits of new and sustainable discoveries in chemistry into commercial opportunities.   The guest lecture is a part of the Dean's Distinguished Lecture Series sponsored by the DSU College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences & Technology. 

Author Thomas Chatterton Williams to Speak at DSU

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Losing My Cool is DSU's selection this academic year for its "One Book, One Campus". This speaker program is a collaboration between the Division of Student Affairs and the Division of Academic Affairs.
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Thomas Chatterton Williams' book Losing My Cool is DSU's selection this academic year for its "One Book, One Campus" program, in which the University community -- students, faculty and staff -- are encouraged read and discuss. It is required reading for first-year students in their University Seminar course.

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Delaware State University will present an author who is connecting in a big way with this year’s DSU community when it hosts Thomas Chatterton Williams in a guest lecture at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus.   The event is free and open to the public.   Thomas Chatterton Williams is the author of Losing My Cool, a memoir in which he describes his life growing up as a mixed race youth who always considered – and still does – himself to be black. The book also deals with the lure of the hip-hop culture, Mr. William’s struggle for identity, and the love of family.   Mr. Williams’ book takes an extraordinary look at a subset of culture through his personal experience as well as through anthropological and philosophical discussions. Within the book, the author shares his pointed perspective on hip-hop culture and the obstacles it can be to serious engagement with the world.   Losing My Cool is DSU’s choice this academic year for its annual “One Book, One Campus” program, which selects a book each year for the campus community – students, faculty, staff – to read and discuss. The book is also used as part of DSU’s University Seminar Course for first-year students.   Thomas Chatterton Williams notes in his bio that he “was educated in his father’s study.” He holds a BA in philosophy from Georgetown University and a master’s degree from the Cultural Reporting and Criticism program at New York University. His writings have appeared in the Washington Post and n+1, among other places. He lives in New York City.   At the end of his presentation, Mr. Williams will engage the audience in a question and answer period.  

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