February 2014


DSU Alum to Premiere Film "16th and Philly" Feb. 11 at DSU

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Isaiah Nathanial, Class of 2004, is a former four-year Hornet basketball player, has produced a documentary film about the famed 16th Street pick-up basketball in North Philadelphia that produced a number of players who would go on to compete in college and professionally, including in the NBA and overseas leagues.

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DSU alumnus and filmmaker Isaiah Nathaniel will make his alma mater a part of the premiere tour of his new documentary 16th and Philly when it screens on campus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11 in the Longwood Auditorium of the Bank of America Building.   The screening is free and open to the public.   Mr. Nathaniel, who also played basketball for DSU from 2000-2004, has done a documentary on the famed North Central Philadelphia Basket League – known commonly in Philly as the 16th Street League, because its outdoor courts are located on the corner of 16th Street and West Susquehanna Ave. in North Philadelphia. During its prominent years of the early 1980s to the early 2000s, it was considered one of the top pick-up leagues on the East Coast.   The league produced a number of players who went on to compete in college, overseas and in professional leagues and the NBA such as Hank Gathers, Bo Kimball, Doug Overton, Lionel Simmons, Ronald “Flip” Murray, Cuttino Mobley, Aaron “AO” Owens, Rodney “Hot Rod” Odrick and many others.   Mr. Nathaniel said the documentary was made to honor the memory and legacy of the 16th Street League and preserve some of the stories.   “Anytime people talk about basketball in Philly, there’s always some who remember and talk about the 16th Street League,” Mr. Nathaniel said. “Whether you witnessed it as a player or a spectator, it never leaves you.”   Following the film, there will be a question-and-answer period between the audience and the filmmaker.

Guest Lecture on Bio-Based Materials for Chemistry, March 6

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DSU’s 2014 Sustainable Chemistry Seminar Series will feature guest speaker Dr. Rich Chapas who will give a presentation on “Bio-based Materials for Chemical and Fuels” at 11 a.m. Thursday, March 6 in room 323, Mishoe Science Center (south) on campus. The guest lecture is free and open to the public. Dr. Chapas currently runs a consulting business, through which he has worked with startup companies such as H2OPE Biofuels, for which he served as chief executive officer. He is also an educator whose teaching experience includes strategy, technology transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship, sustainability and green business, which he teaches at the University of Delaware. He has a breadth of experience in developing and commercializing new products. His patent portfolio includes products that are generating over $30 million in sales. His technical and business expertise includes bio-based materials, polymer chemistry, nonwovens, composites, adhesives, and absorbent materials.

DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman Gives Corporate Wisdom during DSU Visit

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DSU President Harry L. Williams and DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman discussed wide range of corporate topics during a 40-minute Open Forum before a packed Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building.

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Ellen Kullman shared how she worked her way up through the ranks of DuPont to become its CEO. Ellen Kullman, CEO of DuPont and the chair of its Board of Directors, and DSU President Harry L. Williams engaged in a dialogue during a Feb. 11 Open Forum on the current emphasis of Delaware’s largest private employer, the importance of connecting science with the marketplace, and the important skills needed to work for the company. The discussion took place on stage in the Bank of America Building’s Longwood Auditorium before a standing-room-only crowd of students and faculty. As the DuPont CEO since 2009, Ms. Kullman is the 19th executive to lead the company since DuPont was founded in 1802. In overseeing the science company – which has 66,000 employees worldwide – Ms. Kullman has been ranked as #3 among the "50 Most Powerful Women in Business" by Fortune magazine, and also was named one of the 50 "World’s Most Powerful Women" by Forbes magazine. Prior to the Open Forum, Ms. Kullman paid a visit to the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center where she spoke with student and faculty scientists about the 14 research projects that were on display there in poster presentations. “It was very exciting to see these research projects,” Ms. Kullman said. “I enjoyed the passion that the researchers had for what they are doing.” The DuPont CEO shared that she is a native of Wilmington. After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, she worked for Westinghouse and General Electric before joining  DuPont in 1988. On the way to DuPont, she earned a Master of Business Administration degree. In noting that DuPont is a market-driven global science company, Dr. Williams asked the CEO how DuPont “connects the dots” from science to the market. Ms. Kullman said that in the past, DuPont operated under the principal that if the company created the product, the marketplace would come. “Now we spend a lot of time creating cross-sectional teams that work to bring science and engineering to the market,” she said. “If we don’t connect the dots from our science to the market, we won’t be successful.” Ellen Kullman listens to Rita-Kusi Appiah, a plant science graduate student, who explains her epigenetics research. The CEO noted that DuPont has established 12 Innovation Centers around the world, which are places for scientists, marketers and customers to come together and talk about what can be. “It has globalized our company,” she said. Ms. Kullman said in order to stay relevant and successful, DuPont has had to “give up the past, look to the future and do it strategically.” In doing so, DuPont has let go of its longtime traditional paint products operation and also announced plans to spin-off its chemical division to become a standalone operation. “I ran one of those businesses, so it was hard,” Ms. Kullman said. “But at the end of the day, I had to think of the greater whole.” She said because it is a science company, innovation is essential. “If we stop being an innovator, we will stop growing,” she said. “If we make our customers more successful, then we will be more successful.” When Dr. Williams asked her if DuPont would support a public-private partnership to train scientists for the new agriculture revolution, Ms. Kullman said while DuPont believes such partnerships are important, it is equally important for the goals to be aligned. “It has got to be set up for the right kind of success,” she said. “It is more than just giving money, but the money should go to something that you value and that we value.” Ms. Kullman talked about the importance of  how leaders communicate. “I have learned that the consistency of message is important,” she said. “I have learned I need to spend 50 percent more time on communications than I would naturally do.” In talking about the skills DuPont is looking for in college graduates, she said the areas of finance, accounting, marketing, sales, engineering and science research are disciplines important to the company. But she also noted that students should become adept at soft skills. “With the interns we get, I am always interested in learning if they can work as a team,” Ms. Kullman said. “You have to work with people, and for that reason soft skills are important.” She also stressed the importance of finding good mentors. “Mentors helped me understand  my self-awareness, how I come across to people,” Ms. Kullman said. “I think you need to seek out people who will tell you the truth.”

DSU Resident Director Authors MACUHO article on Positivity

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The article "The Power of Positivity" by DSU's Brandy Garlic -- printed in its entirety below as it appears in MACUHO Magazine -- is a message of great value for everyone on campus and beyond.

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Brandy Garlic, the resident director of University Village Apartment, authored the below article on page 32 in the Winter Issue of MACUHO Magazine, a publication of the Mid-Atlantic Association of College & University Housing Officers. At first, the plan for this webpage was to simply mention her authorship of the piece and summarize its message. However, after reading it, it became clear that it was a message that every member of the DSU community – students, staff, faculty, administrators, alumni and anyone else who takes the time to read it – could and would benefit from it. So the article has been reproduced below in its entirety. The University Village Residential Education staff appears on the front cover of the Winter Issue of MACHUHO THE POWER OF POSITIVITY Brandy Garlic, Resident Director University Village Apartments, Delaware State University             Let’s be honest. Working in housing and residential education is a lot of work! There is so much emphasis on customer service, office hours, on call, late nights, policies and procedures that sometimes we forget the bare essentials that we need to get to the meat of the job done. I am a firm believer (and I preach this to my students and staff) that, “your attitude determines the outcome.” If you approach the Resident Assistant position  and a career in general with a negative attitude, then you will have  negative results. If you approach an irate student with negativity, you had better believe that you will get negative results. There truly is power in positivity.            Brandy Garlic             This may seem like mere words to you, but it has become a movement on Delaware State University’s campus specifically in the Department of Housing and Residential Education. While planning for fall training this year, I brainstormed a great deal trying to find a theme. Just like most of my “great ideas,” it came to me at 2 a.m. while trying to fall asleep. Positivity!             During my welcome and expectations sessions, I told the RAs, “I do not do well with negativity because I am a positive person. So, if you are having a bad day, and I encounter you, I will sprinkle you with positivity. Smiles are contagious and so is a positive attitude and aura.” To support my thinking and my way of living I showed a TED Talk, “The Happy Secret to Better Work” by Shawn Achor. Shawn’s talk is about positive psychology. He challenges listeners to not allow their external world to determine their happiness.             “If you raise someone’s level of positivity in the present then their brain experiences what we call a happiness advantage,” says Achor. He does a fantastic job of exuding the positivity and energy he discusses in his talk. The feedback from the RAs after hearing this was filled with positivity.             Because of this new way of approaching training, this positive movement, you could see the difference in the way the RAs bonded with their staffs, the way they learned new policies and procedures, and the way they accepted the challenges of training. This may sound like something small, not anything new to professionals or even Chief Housing Officers, but it is something that we as humans sometimes take for granted. Reintroducing positivity to the RAs during training produced powerful results and provided an amazing atmosphere. Anytime they are faced with adversity in life or in the job I challenge them to “sprinkle it with positivity.” I tell them that I don’t care if it’s a salt shaker filled with positivity or a bucket. Sprinkle it with positivity because your attitude in just about any situation can determine the outcome.

Several DSU Events Postponed Due to Forecasted Winter Storm

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Due to a winter snowstorm that is forecasted for the entire state of Delaware beginning on late Wednesday evening (tonight) and throughout the day on Thursday, Delaware State University has postponed the following events on campus: The Founder’s Day events originally scheduled from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the MLK Student Center and at Loockerman Hall is rescheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 25.  The Make Your Mark Guest Speakers Series event on the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 13 in the E&H Theatre. The Hornet Days events on campus from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 14. The rescheduled dates for the above events will be announced later. The DSU Administration has not yet made a decision on the status of University operations for Thursday, Feb. 13. It is expected that a decision will be made by late Wednesday evening (sometime after 10:30 p.m.) and publicized on all University communication channels (website, email, DSU Snowline). 

DSU Hosts 2014 KC Science Fair --- Photo Slideshow and Info

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More than 94 students from among five different Central Delaware middle schools participated in the 3rd annual Kent County Science Fair held in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center at Delaware State University.

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For the third consecutive year, Delaware State University was host site for the annual Kent County Science Fair, which featured 90 projects from students from five Central Delaware middle Schools.   For images from the Kent County Science Fair, click on the below photo slideshow, followed by more information about the event as well as a list of the winners: There were 94 students who submitted projects in the following categories: natural sciences, engineering, physics, health, behavioral & social sciences, and chemistry. Held at the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center on the DSU campus, there were five Kent County middle schools that participated in the science fair – Central (of Dover), William Henry, Fred Fifer III, Milford Center Academy, and Postlethwaite. The 2014 Kent County Science Fair's winning projects and students included: Chemistry 1st – Mixing Liquid with water -Logan Schad- William Henry Middle School 2nd – Does the salt content have any effect on the boiling point of water-Matthew Leager- William Henry Middle School 3rd – Tie: (a) Oxygen & Fire – Nikolas Mandalas- William Henry Middle School (b) Fresh vs salt -Riley McQuaide-William Henry Middle School   Engineering 1st – Helpful Hovercrafts- Noah Mills & Ryan Adkins, Fred Fifer III Middle School 2nd – Soil Bearing Capacity: The pressure is on!-Hashir Cheema- William Henry Middle School 3rd – Effect of Fridge Temperature on Extending Battery Life- Ashish D'Souza- Postlewait Middle School   Health, Behavioral and Social Sciences 1st – How does the Genre of Music Affect Heart Rate -Tierney Bowen William Henry Middle School 2nd – Does No-Name Stain Remover Work Just as Well as Name Brand-Brianna Reed- William Henry Middle School 3rd – Got that subject style- Taylor Mazanek – William Henry Middle School   Natural Sciences 1st – “Rising” Above the rest only what you “knead” -Skylar Campanicki, William Henry Middle School 2nd – Ph of Fruit and How it affects flavor-Abby Haisworth- William Henry Middle School 3rd – Tie: (a) Bacterial Growth: The Truth May Surprise You – Sarah Larose- William Henry Middle School (b) The influence of worms -Taylor Lipski-William Henry Middle School Physics 1st – Magnetic Levitation – Samuel Mackey & Bryant Craig- Fred Fifer III Middle School 2nd – Hot vs Cold Tennis Ball Experiment- Kylee Victory- William Henry Middle School 3rd – Drum and Pitch- Oscar “Henry” Gonzales – William Henry Middle School

DSU Dover & Sussex to reopen on time 2/14; NCCo delayed.

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Kent County got a total of about seven inches of snow over the course of the snow event that began on Wednesday night.

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DSU's main campus in Dover and its Georgetown site will reopen at its regular start time on Friday, Feb. 14 (today). All employees should arrive at those locations at their regular reporting time. The DSU@Wilmington site will delay its reopening today until 11 a.m. All employees at that site should arrive at that time.

March 4 HBCUs/Women Educators Guest Lecture postponed

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Delaware State University has postponed the March 4 guest lecture by Dr. Marybeth Gasman, a historian on higher education, who was slated to give a guest lecture on "A History of HBCUs and the Role of Women Educators in the Longwood Auditorium in the Bank of America Building on campus               Dr. Marybeth Gasman The free and open to the public event will be rescheduled on a date and time to be later announced.. Dr. Gasman is a professor of education at the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education and is one of the leading authorities in the country on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Gasman is a historian of higher education and currently serves as the vice president of the history and historiography section of the American Educational Research Association and as the chair of the American Association of University Professors Committee on HBCUs. Dr. Gasman is the author of several books, including the 2007 book Envisioning Black Colleges: A History of the United Negro College Fund, which was cited as "an invaluable contribution" to the field of higher education for African-Americans and to "the general area of the history of higher education.” Gasman has also published Charles S. Johnson: Leadership Beyond the Veil in the Age of Jim Crow (with Patrick J. Gilpin), Supporting Alma Mater: Successful Strategies for Securing Funds from Black College Alumni (with Sibby Anderson-Thompkins), and Uplifting a People: African American Philanthropy and Education (with Kate Sedgwick). She has a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Communication from St. Norbert College and a Master of Science and Ph.D. in Higher Education and Law from Indiana University. Gasman has been a Penn Graduate School of Education faculty member since 2003.

Chemistry Guest Speaker to Discuss Novel Polymer Feb. 18

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Delaware State University’s Department of Chemistry will host a Feb. 18 guest lecture by Dr. Thomas Schultz of Horizon Partners Ventures, LLC, who will speak on the topic of “Biodegradable, Bio-Renewable Super Absorbent Polymers.”   The guest lecture will be held at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 18 in Room 323 of the Mishoe Science Center South. The event – which is part of the department’s 2014 Sustainable Chemistry Seminar Series – is free and open to the public.   Dr. Schultz will talk about the development of hydrogels as a biodegradable alternative to polyacrylate-based super absorbent polymers that are a contaminant in the ground and at landfills. Also having received more than $500,000 in research grants since 2011, Dr. Schultz will share insights on how to convince funding entities that an innovation is a better bet to be funded.   Dr. Schultz is currently a partner with Horizon Partners Ventures LLC, a Delaware-based technology firm founded in 2012 as a commercialization business that identifies unmet needs in the chemicals, agriculture, materials and pharmaceutical markets and matches innovations with the right benefits to those needs. Horizon obtains Small Business Innovation Research grants and private funding to provide the research and business development needed to bring the products to market.   Dr. Schultz holds a Ph.D. in Physical Organic Chemistry (New York University) and training in Business Management (INSEAD, France). His professional focus is on the building of ‘product engines’ and new initiatives in the physical sciences markets. He has more than 40 patents and numerous publications.   Dr. Schultz’s 30 years as an R&D executive has led to the creation of significant new products at E.I. DuPont, L’Oreal, P&G, Shiseido Ltd., Playtex, Sculptz Inc., Clorox and Bristol-Myers-Squibb across a range of product categories.

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