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Delaware State University
Department of  Sociology & Criminal Justice
Delaware Hall
Room 122
(302) 857-6670
(302) 857-7774

Dr. Dorothy Dillard, Chairperson, Assiociate Professor

 

 

  Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice

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The Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice is committed to the principles of a liberal education and to assisting its students to think sociologically in order to better understand human society and human behavior. The Department’s curricula are designed to not only prepare students for careers and graduate studies in Sociology and Criminal Justice, but also to equip them with a far-reaching view of the world consistent with the goals of a liberal arts education and to prepare them to recognize the social institutions and patterns upon which everyday life rests.

The Department offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice. The Sociology major provides a comprehensive grounding in the academic discipline of Sociology, its theories, methods, and findings. The Criminal Justice major provides a comprehensive grounding in the discipline of criminology, as well as analysis of the multitude of social factors and institutions that impact the criminal justice system. The Department also offers a minor in Sociology and a minor in Criminal Justice.   Click on following links for the curriculum for the Criminal Justice or Sociology Degrees:

Criminal Justice Curriculum

Sociology Curriculum

Why Choose a Degree in Sociology/Criminal Justice?

Sociology graduates have successful careers in such diverse occupations as non-profit business consultation, healthcare, gerontology, risk management and insurance fund-raising and advocacy groups, international relations, state and federal government agency administration, urban and community planning, military officer, career management, evaluation research, seminar and workshop consultations, public opinion polling, market research and employee relations. 

Criminal Justice careers may entail law enforcement, probation and corrections, legal research, or homeland security. Preparation for professional and graduate schools includes law school or advanced degrees in Sociology. Today,  a variety of  master’s and doctoral programs are offered in criminal justice, criminology, gender studies, urban sociology, and applied sociology across the country and around the globe.
 

Major in Sociology

In order to graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, a student must complete at least 120 credit hours of coursework to include: (1) all required general education courses, (2) the following required Sociology courses: 37-101, 103, 203, 206, 210, 303, 310, 314, 322, 412, 420, 435 and 448; (3) three Sociology elective courses selected from a recommended list (see below); and, (4) a Social Science elective. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each Sociology course.

Proposed List of Courses that would satisfy Sociology Elective Requirements:

 

Men and Women in Society
Criminology
Real/Reel Culture
Law Enforcement
Population Analysis
Courts and Criminal Justice
Sociology of Law
Criminal Law
Technology and Society
Juvenile Delinquency
Principles of Corrections
Victimology
Social Problems
Criminal Justice Administration
Social Deviance
 

 

Minor in Sociology

To graduate with a minor in Sociology, a student must complete 18 hours of course work. Required courses are: Introduction to Sociology, Social Institutions, Social Psychology, Methods of Research in Sociology, Sociological Theories and an elective course in Sociology at the 300 or 400 level.

Major in Criminal Justice

To graduate with a Bachelors Degree in Criminal Justice, a student must complete at least 120 credit hours of coursework to include: (1) all required general education courses; (2) The following Criminal Justice and related courses (Criminal Justice 104, 208, 311, 313, 315, 316, 402, 415, 448, 450 and Sociology 101, 210, 303, 314, 322, 412, and 420); and (3) two Sociology elective courses at or above the 300 level selected from a recommended list. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each of the above courses.

Proposed List of Courses that would satisfy Criminal Justice Elective Requirements:

 

Men and Women in Society
Sociology of Law
Real/Reel Culture
Technology and Society
Population Analysis
Sociology of the Family
Cultural Anthropology
Juvenile Delinquency
Social Problems
Criminal Justice Administration
Social Change
Social Stratification

 

Minor in Criminal Justice

To graduate with a minor in Criminal Justice, a student must complete 18 credit hours of course work. Required courses are: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Criminology, Law Enforcement, Courts and Criminal Justice, Methods of Research and an elective course in Criminal Justice at the 300 or 400 level.

**A minimum grade of “C” is required for the following general education courses: English Composition I. English Composition II, University Seminar, Speech, Critical Thinking, Global Societies, and Lifetime Fitness and Wellness. 

 

Sociology & Criminal Justice
Dept. Faculty


Dr. Dorothy Dillard
Associate Professor
129A Delaware Hall
302 857 7510
302 857 6672 (fax)

ddillard@desu.edu
 

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Research Methods
  • Corrections
  • Drug Use and American Society
  • Internship
     

Dr. Lee Streetman
Professor

112 Delaware Hall
302-857-6678

lstreetman@desu.edu

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Criminology
  • Juvenile Delinquency
  • Criminal Law
  • Courts and Criminal Justice

 

Nena  Sechler Craven
Instructor
118 Delaware Hall
(302) 857-6671

Teaching and Research Interest

  • Introduction to Sociology 
  • Sociological Theories 
  • Social Psychology 
  • Elementary Statistics 
  • Gender 
  • Sexuality 
  • Deviance
  • Popular Culture
  • Men and Women in Society
     

Kylie Parrotta
Instructor 
134 Delaware Hall
(302) 857-7694

kparrotta@desu.edu

Teaching and Research Interest

  • University Seminar
  • Introduction to Sociology
  • Research Methods
  • Race and Ethnic Relations
  • Deviance
  • Sentencing Disparity
  • Work-Family-Leisure Balance
  • Social Construction of Identity
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning