September 2012


DSU Moves Up to 13th in the Annual HBCU Rankings

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Delaware State University has moved up to 13th among 80 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the country in the annual ranking released today by U.S. News & World Report. DSU President Harry L. Williams said he expects DSU to continue moving up in the rankings in the future as well.   DSU was tied last year with South Carolina State University for 15th place and this year surpassed that school (this year 14th) as well as moved passed Elizabeth City University, which dropped to a 20th  tie with Morgan State University.   Among Mid-Atlantic Region schools, DSU joins Howard University (2nd), Hampton University (4th) and Morgan State (20th) that made the top 20 HBCUs in the 2013 ranking.   DSU President Harry Lee Williams said the elevation of the University from 15th to 13th validates that the University is moving in the right direction, but also challenges the institution to work hard to continue moving up in the rankings in the upcoming years.   “The schools that are currently ahead of us are not doing anything that we aren’t capable of doing -- and in many areas DSU is already accomplishing,” Dr. Williams said. “The University will continue to strive diligently to build on the great success of our recent affirmation of DSU’s accreditation and continue to make best practices the standard in carrying out our institutional mission.”   The DSU president added, “As DSU consistently does that, our rise in this HBCU ranking will continue.”   When U.S. News & World Report first published its HBCU ranking in 2008, DSU ranked #22, and then rose to #17 in 2009 and 2010, before rising to 15th last year.     The HBCU rankings are based on the following categories to assess academic quality: assessment by administrators at peer institutions, retention of students, graduation rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.   Spelman College of Atlanta, Ga., is ranked as the No. 1 HBCU in the country by the magazine, a top distinction it has held since 2008. Spelman is followed by No. 2 Howard University and No. 3 Morehouse College.  

Poverty Tour 2.0 -- Photos Slideshow

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(L-r) Dr. Cornel West and Tavis Smiley brought their Sept. 13 Poverty Tour 2.0 event to DSU's Memorial Hall Gymnasium before a crowd of about 1,700.

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It was an historic evening at Delaware State University as the institution hosted a stop by noted TV and radio talk show Tavis Smiley and eminent intellectual and author Dr. Cornel West, who brought their Poverty Tour 2.0 to the campus on Sept. 13. Not to be accused of shying away from the general African American thought with respect to the upcoming presidential election, both renowned speakers challenged the incumbent President Barack Obama and his opponent Mitt Romney to stop ignoring the problem of poverty in their campaign discourse. For images from the Poverty Tour 2.0 at DSU, see the below photo slideshow. Photos by Carlos Holmes:

DSU President Appoints Dr. Teresa Hardee as VP of Finance

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DSU President Harry L. Williams announced today that he has appointed Dr. Teresa Hardee as the University’s new vice president of finance.             Dr. Teresa Hardee   In her DSU post, Dr. Hardee will oversee and manage the day-to-day fiscal operations of the University, including budget, payroll, accounting, accounts payable/receivable, purchasing, contracting, fiscal planning, banking, investment reporting, procurement, cash management, housekeeping, maintenance, deferred maintenance and facilities.   Dr. Hardee will report directly to the DSU president and work closely with Amir Mohammadi, executive vice president and University treasurer. Mr. Mohammadi – who now works as part of the Office of the President – is responsible for the oversight of enterprise risk management, institutional research planning and analysis, academic and international program fiscal planning, human resources, information technology and other areas.   Dr. Hardee arrives at DSU after serving the last five years as the chief financial officer and vice president for Administrative and Financial Services at Florida A&M University.   Prior to that, Dr. Hardee served as the assistant vice chancellor for budgets and financial planning from 2003 to 2007 and as the director of internal audit from 2002 to 2003, both at North Carolina Central University. She also held a succession of posts for the state of North Carolina as an investment accounting manager for the Department of State Treasurer (North Carolina), as a state auditor and as an advanced state management analyst from 1996 to 2002.   Dr. Williams said Dr. Hardee is a “first-rate talent” and he is “delighted” to have her as part of the DSU leadership team.   “This is an exciting opportunity to have someone with Dr. Teresa Hardee’s experience working with our finance staff,” Dr. Williams said. “She has been a state auditor, university auditor and served as a CFO at Florida A&M, where she oversaw a budget of over $492 million. She has done it all.”   Mr. Mohammadi, who served as the chair of the search committee, said with the University embarking on the construction of a new optics research facility, moving toward the future establishment of a new Wilmington area satellite site and continuing its ongoing energy saving upgrades on campus, this was a critical appointment.   “As a seasoned finance professional, Dr. Hardee will hit the ground running on day one,” said Mr. Mohammadi. “There is nothing that we have going on at DSU that she hasn’t encountered in her depth of financial experience.”   Dr. Hardee's first day in the finance leadership post will be on Oct. 1.    

Dr. A. Richard Barros Named Trustee Emeritus

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In 1977, A. Richard Barros decided one way he could fulfill his desire to help eliminate discrimination and prejudice would be to serve on the DSU Board of Trustees. He felt that then-Delaware State College was not Board Vice Chair David G. Turner presents Trustee Emeritus Resolution to Dr. A. Richard Barros being treated fairly and that he could help reverse that trend. Then-Gov. Pierre duPont took him at his word, and appointed him to be on the DSC board. Dr. Barros recently ended his 3½-decade tenure on the DSU Board of Trustees, which has honored him by unanimously approving a resolution that elects him as trustee emeritus. The honor was bestowed on Dr. Barros during the board’s regular meeting on Sept. 13, two weeks after he stepped down from his 35 years of service as a trustee as a result of term limits that were established this year by the board. Dr. Claiborne D. Smith, board chair, praised Dr. Barros for his outstanding service and noted that the trustee emeritus was particularly helpful to him over the years. “He was a personal mentor to me when I first came on the board,” Dr. Smith said. “His encouragement over the years helped keep my energy level very high in terms of work on the board.” Dr. Barros said it has been a pleasure to work with his fellow trustees, administrators, faculty, staff and students in the positive development of the institution. “I am so proud of where DSU is at this point,” Dr. Barros said. “We have accomplished a great deal, and I have never felt better about this University than I do now. “ After his initial 1977 appointment to the board, he was reappointed by Gov. duPont and Gov. Michael N. Castle for additional terms of office until 1994. Around that time, Dr. Barros determined that he wanted his service on the board to be free from dependence on political appointments, and he asked to be appointed by the board. He would remain a board appointment through his remaining 18 years as a trustee. During his tenure, Dr. Barros has served as a board vice chairman, as a longtime chair of the Education Policy Committee, and as a member of the Executive, Student Affairs, and the former Trustees Faculty committees. Among his many important contributions to the University were: his service on the Middle States Self-Study Steering Committee and assistance in the writing of the self-study that led to the reaffirmation of the institution’s accreditation in 2002;  his service as a member of three presidential search committees;  and his 18 years on the University’s federally mandated Internal Review Board, which reviewed all of the institution’s research and studies to protect the welfare and treatment of research subjects. It was the result of Dr. Barros’ initiative that bi-annual meetings were established in the mid-2000s between the board’s Education Policy Committee and the Executive Committee of the DSU Faculty Senate. Dr. Barros’ service to the institution even extended to the classroom where he served as an adjunct associate professor of aviation science at the University. As DSU board member, Dr. Barros has served as a presenter at national conferences of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges covering the subjects  of  “University Security and Premise’s Liability” and “How to Avoid Litigation at a University.” The institution recognized his many contributions to the University in 1991 by awarding him an honorary Doctor of Law. Throughout his tenure, Dr. Barros represented DSU and its board well as an active participant in community affairs and charitable causes. Dr. Barros recently retired from a long and distinguished career as an attorney and lead partner in the law firm of Barros McNamara Malkiewicz & Taylor, P.A.; and In addition to recognizing Dr. Barros for many of the abovementioned accomplishments and dedicated service, the resolution approved by the board on Sept. 13 also noted, “During his long service on the Board, Dr. Barros has demonstrated great dedication and collegiality and has provided highly valued counsel to the deliberations of the Board.”

Brenda Farmer Honored as 2012 Black Achiever

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DSU turned out in support of Brenda Farmer's Black Achiever honor. Seated are (l-r) Dr. Mabel Morrison, Ms. Farmer's son Amillion Mayfield, Brenda Farmer, Allen Ward; (standing l-r) Jane Downs, Dr. Marshall Stevenson along with his wife Lynda, and Germaine Cheatham.

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Jeff Johnson, White House correspondent, presents DSU's Brenda Farmer with a 2012 Black Achiever Award. Mr. Johnson was the keynote speaker. Brenda Farmer, DSU director of Events and Ceremonies, constantly makes the University shine with the way she organizes a wide variety of programs on campus. On Sept. 19 it was Ms. Farmer’s turn to shine as she was honored as a 2012 Black Achiever. The annual Black Achievers in Business and Industry awards is sponsored by the YMCA of Delaware to honor men and women who succeed in both business and community involvement. The Sept. 19 ceremony, at the Chase Center in Wilmington, paid tribute to 20 such achievers, including Ms. Farmer. Jeff Johnson, investigative reporter, White House correspondent and social activist, was the featured speaker of the event. “Brenda Farmer coordinates and choreographs many of the major events on campus, giving her creative touch that represents the University so well,” said Dr. Harry L. Williams, DSU president. “She constantly makes DSU look good to the public and is therefore instrumental in the connection DSU maintains with the communities in Dover and throughout Delaware.” Ms. Farmer is a Delaware State University Hornet through and through. She has earned a BA in Mass Communications and a Master of Social Work, both from DSU. A 19-year-employee of the University, after working in a number of administrative professional positions, Ms. Farmer spent some time in the Office of Admissions where achieved celebrity status with prospective and new students and their families through her campus tours and her Parent Bus Tours of Dover. It is estimated that Ms. Farmer helped introduce the campus and the local Dover area to more than 10,000 students and their parents. In her current post, Ms. Farmer works in the University’s Division of Institutional Advancement. “Brenda is an exceptional event planner and never fails to amaze and wow us with her creative energy,” said Carolyn Curry, vice president of Institutional Advancement. “She is truly DSU’s secret marketing weapon!” Ms. Farmer is the recipient of the Presidential Gold Medal, as well as several DSU Employee of the Year awards. She is also known for her volunteer work and social work assistance in the Dover community.

Proudford Foundation Honors DSU's OrphageniX for Sickle Cell Research

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Dr. Eric Kmiec (third from the left) stands with his DSU researcher: (l-r) research associates Bryan Strouse, Rohina Niamat, Pawel Bialk; post doctorate researcher Dr. Dula Man, and doctoral student Shani Samuel.  

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OrphageniX, a biotechnology company based at Delaware State University, has been presented the Proudford Foundation Award for Research for its work in developing treatments for sickle cell disease.   Dr. Eric Kmiec, chair of the DSU Department of Chemistry and co-founder of OrphangeniX, accepted the award on behalf of the company’s research staff at the foundation’s annual awards dinner on Sept. 20 in Baltimore, Md. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology; Dr. Eric Kmiec, chair of the DSU Dept. of Chemistry and co-founder of OrphageniX; Karen Proudford, president of the Proudford Foundation Board of Directors, and DSU Provost Alton Thompson, celebrate the award.   The Proudford Foundation was established in the memory of DSU alumnus William E. Proudford, who passed away in 2004 at age 76 after a long and brave fight against sickle cell disease. Mr. Proudford graduated from then-Delaware State College with a bachelor’s degree in accounting in 1974.   The scientific basis for OrphageniX was born in the Kmiec laboratory during the mid-1990s. The Kmiec group is well known for its work in the area of human gene therapy and molecular medicine. The company pioneered the concept of gene editing, a molecular process in which a synthetic piece of DNA is introduced into a human cell in order to direct the correction of a genetic mutation that causes an inherited disease. The repair of this inborn error in the chromosome can be thought of as a genetic “spell check” in which the misspelling of the word (or gene) is simply corrected and the disease state reversed.   During the time period between 2000-2006, the Kmiec lab studied and deciphered the molecular mechanism of action – how gene editing actually takes place inside the human cell. This effort was supported by multiple, peer-reviewed (R01) research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the highest level of scientific validation for any technology or research project. The Proudford Research Award has recognized this pioneering effort.   “The early years were challenging as the technology was matured, but now that gene editing has entered the mainstream of science, it was a worthwhile journey,” Dr. Kmiec said.   OrphageniX is now focused on creating a genetic treatment for sickle cell disease, a disorder caused by a single base mutation (misspelling) in a single gene – that is, a misspelled word in the genetic code. Funding for OrphageniX came from a small number of Delaware angel investors; no venture capital money has been put into OrphageniX. The company is privately held and is now an attractive investment opportunity. OrphageniX is now working with DSU and A.I. DuPont/Nemours Children’s Hospital to develop a unique partnership to apply gene editing to sickle cell disease focused in the Delaware Valley region.   This combination brings together strong basic scientists and highly respected clinicians with the central, interdisciplinary theme of translating this validated technology toward clinical application. DSU students, primarily African-American, are heavily involved in this project. OrphageniX is fundamentally committed to helping minority students pursue a career in gene therapy in support of inherited diseases such as sickle cell disease particularly at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.   “We are gratified that the Proudford Foundation has recognized the cutting-edge work that the DSU-based OrphageniX is doing in the area of sickle cell disease,” said Dr. Alton Thompson, DSU provost and vice president of Academic Affairs. “I am certain that more positive developments are to come from this innovative biotechnology company as it seeks and finds significant advances against this disease.”   The mission of the Baltimore-based Proudford Foundation is to support sickle cell awareness, education, state-of-the-art treatment and research, and to bring hope to families affected by the devastating disease.

Royal Drummers & Dancers of Burundi to Perform at DSU Oct. 2

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The performance is free and open to the public. In the Education and Humanities Theatre at 8 p.m. on campus.
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The Burundi drummers and dancers will perform in the Education and Humanities Theatre on campus.

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The Burundi dancers are known for their graceful yet athletic moves. The Royal Drummers and Dancers of Burundi, one of the greatest percussion ensembles in the world, will give a performance at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2 in the Education and Humanities Theatre at Delaware State University.   The performance is free and open to the public.   The dancers and drummers – which come from the African country of Burundi – will share their sacred rhythms and dance, which have been passed down through many centuries and preserved in this performing art form. Their performances are born of ceremonies, such as births, funerals and the enthronement of kings. The performing group uses a variety of large drums.   In Burundi (east-central Africa), drums are sacred and represent, along with the king, the powers of fertility and regeneration. As the origins of their performances are shrouded in ancient legend and mystery, the Royal Drummers and Dancers of Burundi channel the energy and creative spirit of a nation through these drums and the rituals surrounding them.   The group utilizes a variety large drums – Ingoma – that are made from hollowed tree trunks covered with skin. The thunderous sound of the drums with the graceful yet athletic dance that are joined together in this masterful performance represents an important part of Burundi’s musical heritage.  

DSU CREOSA Awarded NSF Optics Research Grant

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(L-r) DSU Provost Alton Thompson, U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, Dr. Noureddine Melikechi (principal investigator of the competitive grant), DSU President Harry L. Williams, U.S. Chris Coons, and U.S. Rep. John Carney gather after the announcement Sept. 27 of the $5 million research grant awarded to DSU.

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The National Science Foundation’s Center for Research Excellence in Science and Technology has awarded Delaware State University a five-year $5 million grant in support of DSU’s Optics Program. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, founding director of DSU's Optics Program, said this grant will help the University produce the next generation of optical scientist, many of whom will come from underrepresented minority groups.   DSU officials formally announced the grant at a Sept. 27 media event held in the University’s Administration Building.   The grant represents the NSF’s validation and financial renewal of DSU’s Center for Research Excellence in Optical Sciences and Applications (CREOSA) as a multidisciplinary program of research, education and outreach.  The five-year grant will fund CREOSA’s phase II work that will build on the accomplishments it has achieved over the previous half-decade.   CREOSA has been instrumental in the prolific development of DSU’s Optics Program. Over the last five years, CREOSA has established master and doctoral optics programs (DSU is the only school among Historically Black College and Universities with a Ph.D. optics program), has helped lead to the graduation of a new generation of optical scientists mostly from minority groups underrepresented in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) area, and assisted in the creation of a DSU culture of innovative integration to foster interdepartmental and multidisciplinary research and education.   Through this NSF funding, CREOSA will move to the next level of excellence and national prominence in research and education in the optical sciences, said Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, DSU’s dean of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology and the vice president of research. He added the funding is critical to the growth of the DSU Optics Program and allows it to reach a point where it can be sustained.   “This grant provides mechanisms to inspire, encourage and train the next generation of optical scientists, and in particular students from underrepresented groups.” Dr. Melikechi said. “We will contribute to the growth of the ever growing field of optics by performing cutting-edge research that has the potential for profound impact on human health through the development of novel nano-opto medical technologies that can be used to detect early signs of diseases.”   According to Dr. Melikechi, who is the founding director of the Optics Program (established in 1998), DSU optics scientists will focus on three interconnected areas during phase II:   Spectroscopy and imaging of biomacromolecules in crowded and complex media. Spin polarization in nanodiamond for nanoscale sensing and imaging. Interactive data mining in experimental optics.   DSU President Harry L. Williams said the University is proud of the accomplishments of its Optics Program.   “Our Optics Program has truly taken on a profound life of its own, and this grant validates all the work that has led to its research accomplishments, collaborations with NASA on the current Mars mission, state funding support for a new optics research facility on campus, and many other achievements,” Dr. Williams said. “This communicates to DSU and the world that the National Science Foundation approves of our direction in optics and wants to see it continued.”   With the support of Delaware’s Congressional Delegation – who were all in attendance at the Sept. 27 media event – administration officials at DSU were able to secure funding to continue this cutting edge program.   “I am proud of DSU for receiving this funding, which will help to prepare a diverse student population to meet the global, scientific and technological challenges of tomorrow,” said U.S. Senator Tom Carper, who along with Sen. Coons and Congressman Carney, worked with the DSU on its application to the NSF.  “DSU’s Optics program is vitally important because it is helping transform the university into a premier research institution.”   U.S. Sen. Chris Coons noted that the advanced research such as that which is taking place at DSU is helping to fuel innovative new business and create the next generation of manufacturing jobs.   “DSU's global — interplanetary — leadership in the field of optics is on display right now aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars,” Sen. Coons said. “This National Science Foundation grant will help DSU’s innovative research continue to inspire the next generation of scientists and expand the potential for this fascinating field of study.” Sen. Tom Carper chats with Dr. Renu Tripathi, assistant professor of optics.   U.S. Rep. John Carney noted that in just a few short years, Delaware State University has developed a world-class optics research center that has already accomplished a great deal. The congressman said that he is looking forward to the seeing what the future holds for DSU’s Optics Program.   "I'm excited that the funding announced today will continue the project well into the future. The Optics Center attracts some of the nation's best and brightest students, gives them unparalleled opportunities while in school, and prepares them for successful careers after graduation,” Rep. Carney said. “It also strengthens the economy by creating jobs and adding more trained, qualified people to the workforce.”   The NSF grant is the latest in a line of funding support that the DSU Optics Program has attracted since its inception. Over the last six years, it has secured $23 million in federal funding. CREOSA was initially created in 2006 by a $5 million NSF grant. Three years later, the Optics Program received a $5 million NASA grant for the establishment of a Center for Applied Optics for Space Science (CAOSS) on campus.   In addition, last year the state of Delaware allocated $10 million toward the construction of a new optics research facility on campus. The University is currently in the design phase of that major capital project.   The two centers now operate under the University’s Optical Science Center for Applied Research (OSCAR). A group of optics faculty and students join Dr. Noureddine Melikechi for a celebratory photograph.                    

DSU Arts Center/Gallery Exhibits Works of George Lorio

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George Lorio, an DSU associate professor of art, has 13 sculpture and installation works on display at the University's Arts Center/Gallery until Sept. 21.

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Delaware State University’s Arts Center/Gallery is featuring the work of art faculty member George Lorio in a show entitled “Current Work” until Sept. 21. The exhibition at the Arts Center/Gallery – located inside the first floor entrance of the William C. Jason Library on campus – is free and open to the public. Mr. Lorio, an associate professor in the DSU Art Program, is exhibiting 13 sculpture and installation artworks in the show. His works express his views on a variety of social issues. The artist and his works will be honored during a reception from 3-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6 in the Arts Center/Gallery. Mr. Lorio will also share insights as an artist into his work during a gallery talk at 11 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 20 also at the Arts Center/Gallery. Mr. Lorio is starting his second year as a DSU faculty member. He came to DSU from Texas where he taught at the University of Texas at Brownsville. He teaches 3D design, 2D design, ceramics and drawing courses.

DSU's Employee Recognition Ceremony -- Photo Slideshow

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(L-r) Chief Harry Downes Jr., James Whitaker, Rhonda Holt, Dr. Cherese Winstead, Erin Hill, Nyonohpyne Ethel Harris, Keith Coleman, Gerre Depp and Brenda Farmer were the celebrated award recipients at this year's Employee Recognition Ceremony.

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DSU held its annual Employee Recognition Ceremony and Dinner on Sept. 27 in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center. For images of the event, click on the below photo slideshow, followed by more information about the awardees: The following persons were presented the Vice President Choice Award: Chief Harry Downes Jr. of Public Safety, James Whitaker of the Office of Testing, Rhonda Holt of the Office of Financial Aid Services, Cherese Winstead of the Department of Chemistry, Erin Hill of the Office of Admissions, Nyonohpyne Ethel Harris of Custodial Services, Crystal Canon of the Payroll Office, Gerre Depp of the Office of the Provost, and Brenda Farmer of the Division of Institutional Advancement. The recipient of the Inspire Excellence Award was Keith Coleman of Residential Education.

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