February 2012


Samantha Holsey Serves as DSU's 1st Leg. Fellow in General Assembly

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Samantha Holsey will serve this semester as a House Legislative Fellow at the state General Assembly, the first-ever DSU student to serve the legislature in this capacity.

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DSU senior Samantha V. Holsey plans to go to law school after receiving her diploma in May , but along the way she is getting a taste of politics as DSU’s first-ever Legislative Fellow to serve in the Delaware General Assembly. Samantha Holsey plans to go to law school to become a corporate lawyer after her DSU graduation.   Ms. Holsey, a Dover resident and 2008 graduate of Caesar Rodney High School, began her first day as a legislative fellow serving the state House of Representative side of the legislature. Specifically she is working on House’s Economic Development, Banking, Insurance and Commerce Committee as well as on the Housing and Community Affairs Committee. Her first day as a House Legislative Fellow was on Jan. 10.   “I will be working on those House committees, but really I work for all 41elected members of the House of Representatives,” said Ms. Holsey, who is completing her undergraduate degree in political science with a minor is law studies. “I could be updating information for the House website, writing minutes, sitting in on caucuses, or doing research on constituent problem that may surface.”   State House Rep. Darryl M. Scott, one of two elected House members representing the Dover area, said he was excited to learn that someone from DSU would be participating in the Legislative Fellows Program for the first time.   “The Legislative Fellows serve a vital role in the House, allowing our committee meetings to run smoothly and providing important research on the issues we face here at the State,” Rep. Scott said. “It is a great opportunity for those here to see firsthand the quality and talent of the students the University produces.  I know Samantha will do her school, community, and state proud, and I look forward to working with her in the upcoming months.”   Dr. Jerome Lewis, director of the School of Public Policy & Administration’s Institute for Public Administration (IPA) at the University of Delaware, founded Legislative Fellows Program at the General Assembly in 1982. “Our new partnership with Delaware State University offers students from both of our universities the opportunity to take part in a hands-on learning experience,” Dr. Lewis said. “Our Legislative Fellows are able to observe and contribute to the decision-making process while working with individuals with diverse views and values such as state and local government officials, business and community leaders, and concerned citizens.”  

DSU Receives $400,000 Welfare Foundation Grant to Upgrade Science Labs

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The $400,000 Welfare Foundation Grant will go toward critical upgrades of the Mishoe Science Center's air control systems, HVAC equipment and cover other improvements.

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Jan. 12, 2012   Delaware State University has received great assistance in its work to strengthen its already strong emphasis on its Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines with the award of a $400,000 grant from the Welfare Foundation.   The generous Welfare Foundation grant will go toward an $826,000 project to renovate the DSU STEM laboratories in the Mishoe Science Center.   The original portion of the Mishoe Science Center (north side) was built in 1964, and a south addition was completed in 1995. The building annually serves 350 STEM-related majors as well hundreds of students in other majors who take classes there every year to fulfill their science requirements.   In their past there have not been sufficient capital funds to counter the deteriorating conditions of the laboratories of the College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences & Technology in the Mishoe Science Center.   The renovation project will include critical upgrades of air control systems, HVAC equipment, and new safety provisions, the installation of a new observatory area that will replace the obsolete one, as well as the necessary computer technologies.     The upgrading of the air control system is particularly critical as much of the college’s research in optics, chemistry, neuroscience and biology areas requires stable air quality and the ability to maintain acceptable humidity levels.   In addition to improving the research environment and possibilities for DSU science students and faculty, the upgrades will improve the University’s potential for attracting high-caliber researcher to the institution, as well as draw businesses and corporations that might find commercial application with DSU research activities.  

DSU Mourns the Loss of Honors Student Akiah S. Powell

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Akiah S. Powell (left), a senior political science major who passed away on Feb. 4, was close friends with Samantha Holsey, also a DSU senior political science major.

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  The DSU community is mourning the loss of Akiah S. Powell, a senior political science major who passed away unexpectedly on Feb. 4 due to natural causes.   The death of Ms. Powell was made all the more poignant by her projected graduation this upcoming May and her plans to enter law school immediately afterward.   Formerly of the Bronx, N.Y., her family had moved to Bushkill, Pa., about five years ago, according to her mother, Marilyn Powell. By all accounts, Akiah was a dedicated student who was known to be service oriented, a faithful friend and destined for success. She was on the Dean’s List throughout her entire academic journey at DSU. Akiah S. Powell would have graduated in May and expected to enrolled in law school in the fall.   A political science major with a minor in pre-law, Ms. Powell had already taken the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) and applied to a number of law schools. “When it came to legal studies, I believe that Akiah found her niche and a path to a successful career,” said Dr. Sam Hoff, the director of the DSU Law Studies Program. “She had demonstrated the requisite skills to become an attorney and she was on the precipice of being accepted to law school.”   Dr. Hoff noted that Akiah possessed strong opinions about certain cases he taught in her Constitutional Law and Civil Liberties class.   “She had a sort of righteous indignation about injustices that cannot be taught,” Dr. Hoff said. “It is a trait that made me confident that she would have been a stellar attorney and would have contributed significantly to the legal profession.”   Akiah had been a McNair Research Scholar since the spring of 2011 and within that program had demonstrated a passion for education and her love for fellow students, according to Tonia P. Conley, director of the DSU McNair Program. Ms. Conley said upon becoming a McNair Scholar, Akiah quickly bonded with her peers in the program and demonstrated her leadership and innate strengths among them.   “We could always depend on the warmth of her personality and the beauty of her smile,” Ms. Conley said. “Akiah epitomized our program’s slogan: ‘Pursuing Excellence Without Excuse.’ She was certainly more than a student… she was a scholar!”   She said as a McNair scholar, Akiah had conducted research with Dr. Hoff (also a professor of political science) on a project entitled “The Continuing Impact of Religion on Public Policy,” and was to have presented that paper at a research event in Nashville, Tenn., in March 2012.     Dr. Akwasi Osei, chair of the Department of History, Political Science and Philosophy, as well as another advisor of Ms. Powell, said that she was a grounded and focused student who always had a smile and was eager to help.   “She had a quiet strength,” Dr. Osei said. “She was strong in a quiet way and she made her presence felt quietly.”   During Akiah’s undergraduate journey, she distinguished herself as an inductee of both the Pi Sigma Alpha National Political Science Honor Society/Upsilon Chapter, as well as the Pi Gamma Mu International Social Science Honor Society/Delaware Alpha Chapter. She was a co-recipient of her academic department’s 2011 George Washington Leadership Award, a Thurgood Marshall scholar, and was a member of the DSU Honors Program. She had been selected to be an alternative legislative fellow at the Delaware General Assembly.   Ms. Powell also worked in the Division of Academic Enrichment as a supplemental instruction leader and Writing Lab specialist/tutor during the 2011-2012 school year. According to Kenneth Hunt, a supplemental instruction coordinator, Akiah showed exceptional knowledge in the field of English; and as an English SI Leader and writing lab specialist, she demonstrated outstanding leadership and dedication to each student.    “In addition to the students gaining a strong sense of confidence, the overall class average increased as a result of her method of teaching,” Mr. Hunt said. “She gracefully served both positions within the division with honor and distinction.” Akiah S. Powell (2nd from the right) enjoys a fellowship moment with some friends.   Jean H. Gilroy, academic support coordinator, added that “Akiah was a role model to all the students with whom she worked. Many lives have been touched, and many students will succeed and graduate from DSU due to her efforts.”   Among her student peers she was good friend and someone who could always be counted on to be helpful.   Samantha Holsey, also a senior political science major, has been a close friend of Akiah ever since their freshman year when they shared an honors suite in Wynder Towers. Ms. Holsey described her good friend as “very genuine and independent” and as being one who was interested in others’ success as well as her own.   “Instead of trampling over you to get to first-place, she would bring you with her,” Ms. Holsey said.   Akiah Shekira Powell was born to Hillary (Piper) and Marilyn Powell on March 12, 1990, in Bronx, N.Y.  Akiah loved the Lord and was a member of the Smyrna Seventh-Day Adventist Church located in the Bronx.  She attended the R. T. Hudson Elementary School and graduated from Northeastern Academy in New York City.  She began her academic career at DSU in August 2008.                     Akiah S. Powell   The following is an excerpt of a personal statement that Akiah wrote concerning her motivations and goals for her life:   “One of my favorite quotes by Aristotle says, “We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.”  This quote inspires and motivates me throughout my educational journey and helps to remove the negative connotation and assertion by some that people are the product of their environment.  Rather, I am committed to ongoing studies, research, improving myself, and sharing and encouraging others to do the same; by doing so, I hope to impact not only my community but that of others.” – Akiah S. Powell   Funeral services will be held on Sunday, Feb. 12, with a viewing from 3-5 p.m. and a homegoing service immediately afterward at 5 p.m. at Ephesus Seventh Day Adventist Church, 101 W. 123rd St., in the Harlem in New York City. The burial will take place the following day, Monday, Feb. 13) at 10 a.m. at the George Washington Cemetery, Paramus, N.J.  

Nationals-bound Flying Hornet Team honors Tuskegee Airmen

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(L-r) DSU Flying Hornets team members Will Jester, Isaac Shellenberger, Marc Anderson (faculty advisor/coach), Kenneth Ritchie, and Willie Gonzalez, stand with one of the DSU aircraft adorned with a red tail in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen and the film about them that is being screened in Dover.

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  The DSU Aviation Program – which will be sending a team to compete in the National Intercollegiate Flying Association’s National Flight Competition in May – is getting really excited about the new film Red Tails that tells the stories of the WWII exploits of the Tuskegee Airmen.   The students are so excited, they have applied a new coat of paint to a number of their aircraft that they maintain at the Delaware Air Park.   In honor of the African American flyers and the new film, the DSU Aviation Program members have painted the tail section of several of its planes red. Aviation students plan to go to the movies to see the opening of Red Tails. James Otis Handy, an aeronautical technical engineer with the original Tuskegee Airmen, is honored with a cake on the occasion of his 92nd birthday during a Jan. 20 Aviation Program celebration at the Delaware Air Park hangar. To his right is retired Brig. Gen. Ernest G. Talbert Jr.   “It is our way of honoring the Tuskegee airman,” said Hans Riegle, assistant director of the Aviation Program.   The Aviation Program has also invited Tuskegee Airman mechanic Otis Handy to the Delaware Air Park where the students will celebrate his 92th birthday with a pizza luncheon party on Jan. 20.   The program’s Flying Hornets team was among the top three scoring teams at the NIFA Regional Flight Competition in October, and that performance guaranteed the Hornet flyers an invitation to compete in the NIFA National Flight Competition on May 13-17 in Kansas City, Mo.   The Flying Hornets, led by their faculty advisor and coach Marc Anderson, include sophomore Willie Gonzalez, junior Will Jester, senior Kenneth Ritchie, and junior Isaac Shellenberger. All four team members are DSU aviation majors, and Mr. Anderson is a 2011 graduate of the program.     During the October regional competition, the Flying Hornets finished third in the competition. Mr. Gonzalez finished fourth overall, competing against juniors and senior who already hold commercial and flight instructor ratings.   “The fact that our team finished third is amazing and a testament to the talent of our students and the effort they exerted in preparation for the competition, because we had only four team members competing against teams that had eight or nine participants,” said Capt. Stephen Speed, DSU Aviation Program director.   Capt. Speed noted that because the team awards were cumulative, the DSU students were at a disadvantage. “If we had one more team member, we would have finished in second place,” he said.      

DSU Mourns the Passing of Dr. Fatma Helmy

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             Dr. Fatma Helmy, 1927-2012 Feb. 15, 2012 Delaware State University is mourning the loss of Dr. Fatma M. Helmy, who dedicated her academic career to preparing some of the University’s top science students to go onto doctoral studies and research careers. Dr. Helmy, the founding director of DSU’s Minority Access to Research Careers Program, peacefully passed away on Monday, February 13, 2012, at her home in Smyrna, Delaware. She was 84. At time of her death she was a full professor in the DSU Department of Biological Sciences, where she taught from 1975 until May 2011. Before she came to DSU, she taught in the University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Ky.; Tulane University, New Orleans, La.; and the University of New Orleans, La. It was in the Minority Access to Research Careers, commonly known by the acronym MARC, in which she made her  indelible “MARC” on the University, positively impacting the career path of many of the University’s top science students Dr. Helmy made it her mission to ensure the minority students were provided an environment that would make research careers possible for them. Toward that goal, she was awarded the Minority Biomedical Research Support grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 1980 to 1991. She initiated the DSU Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) program through a NIH  MARC grant in 1988. That grant that was successfully renewed throughout her directorship of the program until 2008. The DSU MARC Program produced 22 students who went on to earn Ph.D.s in biomedical sciences disciplines from prestigious universities throughout the country. Dr. Noureddine Melikechi, dean of the DSU College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Technology, said Dr. Helmy’s dedication, passion, drive and love provided energy and a vision that led to major successes for the MARC program for a period of 20 years.  “Her hard work provided opportunities for students to be prepared to pursue their doctoral degrees at top institutions in the USA,” he said. “The success of these students is invariably connected to her and the MARC program.”  Other faculty peers also express a deep respect and admiration for her dedicated years at DSU. “Dr. Helmy’s skill as an educator, her mentorship to promising young minds, her tenacious commitment to integrity, and her dedication and generosity to Delaware State University are unequaled in my world,” said Richard Driskill, a retired assistant professor of biology who continues to teach at DSU, and was a colleague of Dr. Helmy throughout her entire tenure. “Although I will miss her friendship and kindness dearly, she will remain a wellspring of inspiration for me.” “Dr. Helmy’s dedication to students for over 35 years at DSU has positively impacted thousands of students and set a high standard of teaching for us all to aspire,” said Dr. Leonard Davis, chair of the Department of Biological Sciences. “However, she will be forever remembered for the focus on her MARC students that has created a nationwide legacy of successful scientists.” Dr. Marquea King, a 1997 DSU MARC graduate, completed her Ph.D in toxicology from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University and currently works as an toxicologist/environmental scientist for the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington D.C. She credits Dr. Helmy as being critically instrumental in her academic and professional development. “The enriching environment that Dr. Helmy, a.k.a. the MARC Program, has provided me as a fledgling student while in high school, into undergrad, and onto graduate school has no doubt made a profound impact on my life,” Dr. King said.  “The preparations and provisions bestowed upon me by Dr. F. Helmy and to dozens of other very fortunate individuals have laid the foundation for constant success.  Dr. F. Helmy has afforded me both the tools and the opportunities to be a true presence and role model in society as well as a key figure in the future of other promising students’ lives.” Dr. Anthea Aikins, a 2004 MARC graduate, said that Dr. Helmy's wisdom and guidance helped her through her graduate program at the University of Missouri. Dr. King noted that the following passage in Dr. Helmy’s most recent NIH Summary Statement sums her standard of dedication: “The strength of this program is the dogged determination of the program director, Dr. Helmy…There is no other institution in the country that can boast such a high rate of success.  Her dedication and commitment must be applauded.” Dr. Anthea A. Aikens, a 2004 DSU MARC graduate who has returned to her alma mater as a visiting professor, said Dr. Helmy took on a role as her mentor when she was freshman and continued to be one after she entered graduate school. She said Dr. Helmy's desire to see all of the MARC students succeed was quite evident in every encounter she had with them. "One of the techniques Dr. Helmy used to bring the best out of us was in how she always found creative ways to speak 'life' into us," said Dr. Aikins, who completed her Ph.D. in microbiology in 2010 at the University of Missouri. "This challenged all of the MARC students to live up to her expectations." Dr. Melikechi added that Dr. F. Helmy was an excellent mentor who established long-term relationships with her students, and would be forever remembered for her lifelong commitment and numerous contributions to the educational needs of students, particularly those from minority groups. “Dr. Fatma Helmy has left a mark on DSU, its students, its programs, and its future. I am grateful for her life, her service to others,” the dean said.  “As she leaves us, Dr. Fatma Helmy gives us one more lesson: Great educators never die; they simply move on before us.” Dr. Helmy (l) received the Minority Access Inc.'s National Role Model Faculty Award in 2008 from an unidentified representative of the organization. In addition to teaching, Dr. Helmy published 67 scientific articles in scientific refereed journals. She presented her research at 37 international and national professional scientific meetings. She was a member of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), International Association for Women Bioscientists, Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, American Association of Anatomist, Sigma Xi, New York Academy of Sciences, and the American Chemical Society. Due to Dr. Helmy’s dedicated work in teaching, research and mentoring, she received the DSU College of Arts and Sciences Dean’s Special Award for Excellence in Service for two years, and she was nominated “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.” She was the recipient of the DSU Presidential Excellence Award, the DSU Merit Award, the DSU Alumni Association Making a Difference Award, and the 2008 Minority Access Inc. “National Role Model Faculty Award” for Exemplary Achievement in Educating and Motivating Students. Dr. Helmy received her Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and Biology from the University of Cairo, in her native Egypt; her Master of Science degree in Hematology and Histology also from the University of Cairo, and her Ph.D. at Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana. She was married for 33 years to Dr. Marvin Hack, who died in 1999. She is survived by her sister, Dr. Ehsan Helmy of Smyrna (who is also a longtime DSU professor of physics). There will be a visitation at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 16 at Torbert Funeral Homes downtown Dover location at 61 S. Bradford Street. The family will be there to receive condolences. A vehicle funeral procession will depart from the funeral home sometime after 10:30 a.m. that same morning to travel to the Lakeside Cemetery on South State Street (next to Silver Lake), where a graveside service will begin at 11 a.m. According to the funeral home, memorial donations can be made to the American Cancer Society, 92 Reads Way #205, New Castle, DE 19720.  

Kickoff To Wellness, Dominique Dawes -- Photo Slideshow

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Olympic gold medalist Dominique Dawes spent some time with the kids of the DSU Child Development Lab during the Jan. 19 Kickoff to Wellness day at DSU.

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  Jan. 19, 2012   DSU held its second annual Kickoff to Wellness on Jan. 19 with a variety of events in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center during the day and culminated with a motivational address by Olympic gymnast and gold medalist Dominique Dawes in the evening at the Education and Humanities Theatre.   Click on the below slideshow to see photos from the day’s activities:  

DSU to Offer Training in Recognizing Child Sex Abuse

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(L-r) DSU President Harry L. Williams, Delaware Tech President Orlando J. George, Jr., state Attorney General Beau Biden, University of Del. President Patrick T. Harker, and Dr. Jim Wilson, Wilmington University vice president of Academic Affairs, stand united to use the resources of these institutions of higher education to facilitate Steward for Children training in Delaware.

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Delaware State University and several other of the state’s institutions of higher education have announced its commitment to help facilitate training that will help people identify children who have been the victim of sexual abuse. DSU President Harry L. Williams joined University of Delaware President Patrick T. Harker, Delaware Technical & Community College President Orlando J. George, Jr., along with Dr. Jim Wilson, Wilmington University vice president of Academic Affairs, and Delaware Attorney General Beau Biden in announcing the institutions’ plans to facilitate training during a media event held Feb. 16 at the University of Delaware’s Visitor Center. The program – entitled Stewards of Children Training – teach how to recognize the signs and symptoms of sexual child abuse in children, the preventive measures that can be taken, and the mandatory reporting actions that must be taken when such sexual child abuse is suspected. Last September, Attorney General Biden, the YMCA of Delaware, and Prevent Child Abuse Delaware announced a collaborative partnership to train 35,000 Delawareans, or about 5% of the state’s population in the Stewards of Children program in five years. The program is already being implemented in 48 states and 10 countries. Del. Attorney General Beau Biden, who commended DSU and the other institutions of higher education for their commitment to facilitate Stewards for Children training, stands with DSU President Harry L. Williams, and Dr. Gwendolyn Scott-Jones, who will lead the training at DSU. “DSU is proud to join the University of Delaware, Delaware Tech and the Attorney General’s Office in this important training initiative,” said Dr. Williams. “I am confident that from the facilitating efforts of these three state institutions of higher education, Delaware can achieve its goal of training 35,000 people in the state.” The DSU President announced that Dr. Gwendolyn Scott-Jones, chair of the DSU Psychology Department, would lead DSU’s involvement in facilitating the training on campus and out in the community. “Dr. Scott-Jones became one of the first certified (Steward for Children) facilitators in Delaware in April 2011,” Dr. Williams said. “Through Dr. Scott-Jones and others’ work, DSU was the first higher education institution in Delaware to partner with Prevent Child Abuse in Delaware (PCA) to implement the on-site training in the State of Delaware. The Steward for Children training will be provided this year to DSU’s more than 900 employees, as well as to community stakeholder groups. Dr. Scott-Jones said she is excited about partnering with community stakeholders and implementing the trainings here on-site at Delaware State University.   “The training program teaches adults how to prevent, recognize and react responsible to child sexual abuse,” she said. “More specifically, the implementation of this program here at DSU is a monumental opportunity to increase knowledge/awareness, improve attitudes, and change child protective behaviors.” Attorney General Biden said that it is not a child’s job to protect him or herself from abuse, but it is the job of adults. He noted that one in four girls and one in six boys will be sexually abused before the age of 18, yet only one in ten abused kids reaches out for help. “This program gives adults the tools and the information we need to protect kids, who in 9 out of 10 cases are victimized by someone they know,” Attorney General Biden said. “Everyone in Delaware is a mandatory reporter – we are all obligated to intervene when we see a child in danger, but we don’t always know what to look for. When only one in ten abused children reaches out for help, we know that it falls to the adults to see the signs and make the call.”

DSU Represents Strongly at the Annual Go Red Event

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(L-r) LaVar Johnson, senior textile and apparel major, escorts Brenda Farmer, DSU director of Ceremonies and Events, who is modeling a gown he designed. The pair participated in Feb. 3 Go Red event at the Sheraton Inn in Dover.

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Delaware State University represented strongly at the 2012 Southern Delaware Go Red for Women Luncheon and Fashion Show on Feb. 3 at the Sheraton Inn in Dover.   See the below photo and slide show, as well as more information below it concerning DSU’s involvement in the event.       Dr. Robin Williams, the DSU president's wife, gave the keynote address, in which she urged the 400-plus (mostly women) in attendance to live healthy lifestyles and to pay attention to the signs and symptoms of heart disease and not delay in seeking medical attention when needed.   Brenda Farmer, DSU director of Ceremonies and Events, took part in the event's fashion show. She wore a beautiful red gown that was designed by LaVar Johnson, a DSU senior textile and apparel major. Mr. Johnson also served as Ms. Farmer’s escort during the fashion show. Eunice Gwanmesia, a DSU nursing faculty member, and her daughter also modeled outfits during the fashion show.   The DSU Department of Nursing served as an army of health practitioners, providing various types of screenings during the event. The fundraising event is designed to raise awareness about heart disease and stroke for women and to raise funds to support further research and education to benefit Southern Delaware women.    

2012 Delaware Diamond Extravaganza Photo Slideshow

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The 2012 Delaware Diamond Extravaganza were honored on Feb. 3 at the Dover Sheraton.

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Eight individuals were honored for their outstanding contributions to women in sports and education at the 2012 Delaware Diamond Extravaganza on Feb. 3 at the Dover Sheraton. The eight honorees are Delawareans or individuals with ties to the First State and must have been nominated for the honors. See the below photo slideshow for pictures of the honorees and other attendees, followed by more text information on the event. The 2012 Delaware Diamond Extravaganza honorees are as follows: Robert Hastings - Seaford High School tennis coach with 27 years of service and 190 wins. Mary Ann Hitchens - Retired University of Delaware Administrator with over 40 years of service as a student, coach and nationally recognized administrator at UD. Maxine Lewis - Delaware State University Hall of Famer, First Sports Information Director at DSU, pioneer and role model for media relations professionals. Dr. Josette McCullough - Supervisor of Special Education, Appoquinimink School District, Kent County Administrator of the Year; three-sport athlete while at DSU; holds three degrees from DSU. Chris Morgan - former Goldey-Beacom College Director of Athletics; school ranked third nationally in Division II for gender equity compliance; recognized in 2008 by the NCAA for overall excellence in diversity; current Kean University Athletic Director. Mable Morrison - Delaware State University Grand Marshall; 49 years as a music faculty member at DSU. George Pepper - Cape Henlopen High School girls track head coach since 1979; longest serving head girls track coach in the state of Delaware; holds five state titles. John Travis - Created a scholarship foundation for female softball players in the memory of his daughter McKenzie Travis. "There are numerous individuals in Delaware who have played significant roles in providing opportunities to women in athletics," commented Candy Young, DSU Associate Athletic Director and Senior Woman Administrator.  "It's important that we express our gratitude to these leaders and their inspiration to young women in leadership roles." The program began in 2009 as a way to recognize, celebrate and honor individuals in the state of Delaware that have helped women's athletics grow and excel in addition to creating additional scholarship and financial support to aid female athletics programs.  The DDE identifies coaches, administrators, athletes and contributors who meet the following criteria:  

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