May 2012


DSU's Dr. Myna German Presents Symposium in Portugal

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Dr. Myna German, chair of the DSU Department of Mass Communications, poses with some of the students who attended the symposium she presented in Portugal on May 3.

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Dr. Myna German, chair of the Department of Mass Communication at Delaware State University, has recently returned from Portugal, where she presented a symposium on topics relating to her co-published book Migration, Technology and Transculturation. Dr. German presented the symposium at the Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal, made possible by a grant from the Instituto de Contabilidade e Administracao do Porto. The grant was secured by Dr. Clara Sarmento, director of the Centre, who wanted to do outreach to Delaware State University in conjunction with future research collaboratives. A delegation from the University of Bourgogne in Dijun also was present at the two-day symposium. Dr. German spoke to faculty and students about DSU, the research centers involved in funding Migration, Technology and Transculturation (co-edited with Dr. Padmini Banerjee of the DSU Department of Psychology), and future areas of possible joint research. The second part of the seminar was on the content of her research on the history of globalization and mass communication, migration studies, the conceptualization of the field and where it is going.

DSU Honored by Capital School District

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Representing their DSU areas in receiving the Capital School District Community Partner Awards: (l-r) Alex Meredith, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources; Christopher McGuire, DSU Administration Bldg. staff and participating Greek organizations; Dr. Robin Roberts, Office of Student Leadership and Activities; Eric Hart; Department of Athletics; along with Dr. Michael Thomas, superintendent of the district.

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The Capital School District honored several DSU entities with Community Partner Awards during its May 30 Awards Ceremony. Honored from DSU were: DSU Staff and Administration – For its annual Christmas season work in collecting gifts and donations for the district’s Adopt-a-Family Program. The DSU Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources – For its work in donating plants to district schools throughout the year, as well as assisting in the development of a garden at Fairview Elementary School. The DSU Department of Athletics – For the community service of its students-athletes in participating in the Read-Aloud Program, and also for working with children at Fairview Elementary School. The DSU Office of Student Leadership and Activities – For providing gathering space for the district’s mentoring training, and for its Career Services in allowing the district to participate in the annual Job Fair on campus.

DSU's Dr. D. Finger Wright Teaches Afghanistan Women About Addictions

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Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, DSU association professor of social work, was part of a team of substance abuse experts that taught women from Afghanistan about addiction and treatment as it relates to women.

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Dr. Dolores Finger Wright, DSU associate professor of social work, has recently returned from Sicily, where she joined a team of instructors who trained a group of professional women from Afghanistan in addiction issues as they pertain to women. Dr. Finger Wright was a part of the group Guiding the Recovery of Women (GROW), one of 15 instructors with expertise in addiction issues, especially as they relate to women. The instructors represent a wide variety of social service agencies, treatment facilities and academia. Thirty-three professional Afghanistan women – doctors, social workers, therapists and director of substance abuse treatment programs – attended the GROW training program. “That’s why it was a sobering experience, because it provided training to professional women who provide direct services to other women in a war zone,” Dr. Finger Wright said. The GROW training program is designed for addiction specialists, focusing on effective gender-responsive treatment interventions for women substance abusers. The training introduces the principles and values of key experts in the field, and identifies promising practices for treating substance abusing women. The three-week training program in Sicily (an autonomous region of Italy) included topics that explored the relations between substance abuse/treatment and adolescent females, lesbian issues, sexual abuse, domestic violence, detoxification and pregnancy, in addition to other areas. Dr. Finger Wright – who was in Sicily from April 13 to 21 – taught the basic introductory GROW curriculum.

DSU Names Tamika Louis as Women's Head Basketball Coach

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DSU President Harry L. Williams presents Tamika Louis, the new Lady Hornet basketball head coach, with a DSU jacket and hat.

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A new Delaware State University women’s basketball coaching era has begun, as DSU President Harry L. Williams today introduced Tamika L. Louis, a former championship junior college head coach and Division I assistant coach, as the new Lady Hornets head coach. Head Coach Tamika Louis said she expects to establish a winning culture among the Lady Hornets basketball team. In introducing the new head coach at a May 31 media event, Dr. Williams said that he is “very happy” that Coach Louis has decided to become a member of the One Hornet Nation Family. “I expect that she will bring a high-level energy and excitement to our Lady Hornets’ basketball program,” the DSU president said.  Coach Louis arrives at DSU with 14 years of coaching and recruiting experience. Most recently, she served as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator during the 2011-2012 season at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. From 2009-2011, Coach Louis was an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator for St. John’s University. In addition to organizing all recruiting initiatives, game scouting, overseeing player academic progress and off-court mentoring, she was responsible for the development of St. John guards, including 2nd Team All-Big East and Freshman All-American Shennieka Smith. She served as an assistant coach and a recruiting coordinator for the University of Illinois from 2007-2009. Coach Louis was instrumental in signing the No. 2 and No. 3 ranked 2009 class in the country (according to ESPN Hoop Girl and Blue Star rankings), which included All-Americans Destiny Williams and Karisma Penn. From 2002-2005, she was head women’s basketball coach at Mott Community College in Flint, Mich., where the team’s record was 58-33 over those three seasons. The highlight of her MCC coaching tenure was the 2004-2005 season in which the team boasted a 16-0 conference record (27-7 overall), was the champion of Region XII of the National Junior College Athletic Association and earned a bid in the NJCAA Tournament. During that stellar season, Coach Louis received the Michigan Community College Athletic Association and the Region XII Coach of the Year awards.  From 1998 to 2002, she also had stints as an assistant and associate basketball coach at Central High School in Fresno, Calif., Rhodes High School in Cleveland, Ohio, and Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio. After playing her freshman year (1993-1994) at West Virginia University, she transferred to Fresno State where she was the starting point guard and captain from 1995-1998. It was also at Fresno State where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Master of Arts degree, both in communications. In addition to her career progression in athletics, Coach Louis also worked for General Motors in management, product development, sales and marketing from 1999 to 2007, during which time she received the Corporate Woman of the Year Award in 2003. Coach Louis said that as the Lady Hornets’ head coach, she will be a servant-leader and hopes her energy, dedication and work ethic will be infectious to the young women she will coach and mentor. “We will establish a winning culture here with an expectation to excel in the classroom and on the court resulting in MEAC championships,” Coach Louis said. “Just as important, we will develop future leaders who, upon graduation, will make an immediate impact in our global society and positively represent DSU.” Interim AD Eric Hart join Coach Tamika Louis along with her mother Joyce Louis and Faye Sterling, her aunt, after the media event. The decision to hire Coach Louis culminated a two-month search process that began in late March. Serving on the Search Committee for the head coaching post were Dr. Gwendolyn Scott-Jones (committee chair), chair of the Department of Psychology; Dr. Jan Blade, faculty athletics representative; Candy Young, interim senior associate athletics director and senior woman administrator; Dr. Joe Amoako, professor of English and member of the Athletics Council; Dr. Josette McCollough, DSU alumna and former Lady Hornet student-athlete; Dr. Sonja McCoy, associate director of Mentoring and Advising; Dr. Bradley Skelcher, associate provost; and Kianna D’Oliveira, current Lady Hornet student-athlete. Eric Hart, interim DSU athletics director, praised the search committee for its hard work and expressed great hopes for the Lady Hornets basketball program under Coach Louis. “We are starting a new chapter in women’s basketball and I am confident that Coach Louis will be able to build upon a strong basketball legacy here at Delaware State University,” Mr. Hart said. “Coach Louis has built a reputation on the Division I landscape as being a fierce recruiter and has built top tier programs at Illinois and St. John’s, and was on her way to building a strong class at George Washington University.” Coach Louis succeeds former Head Coach Ed Davis, who retired in March after leading the program for 12 years.  

DSU's Planned Early College HS Approved by State Board

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The state's first Early College High School will be located on the campus of Delaware State University.

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The Delaware State Board of Education has notified Delaware State University that it can go ahead with its plans to establish an Early College High School on the campus of DSU. The state Board of Education approved DSU’s application for the charter school during its May 17 meeting. The planned charter high school will be the state’s first Early College High School, which will be designed specifically to serve first generation college-bound students. The Early College High School is a nationally recognized school design brought to Delaware through a partnership between Innovative Schools, a Delaware-based non-profit public school support organization, and EdWorks, DSU and Innovative Schools submitted the charter school application to the Delaware Department of Education in December 2011. After several meetings with the DOE’s Charter School Accountability Committee and a May 8 public hearing, the committee recommended the approval of the application. The State Board followed that recommendation and approved the charter school.  “We are excited about the opportunity to provide an exceptional secondary/post-secondary educational experience to Delawareans,” said Dr. Alton Thompson, DSU provost and vice president of Academic Affairs. “As the first early college high school in the state, we are partnering with the DOE to implement a rigorous curriculum and other support services to ensure our students are competitive on an international level.” The University has included the Early College High School as part of its development of a new Facilities Master Plan, which is expected to be finalized by the fall of 2012. The location of the charter school will be determined by the master plan. Dr. Thompson said the University plans to enroll students in the school by the 2013-2014 school year.  In the Early College model, high school and college combine to form a coherent educational program in which students work toward a high school diploma and up to two years of college credits in four years of high school.  Located on a college campus, the model directly challenges the belief system of under-prepared poor and minority students about their ability to do college level work and get a postsecondary degree.  Housing a high school on the DSU campus is not unprecedented in the University’s history.  In the 1893-94 school year, the then-State College for Colored Students established a two-year preparatory school to help students get ready for a college education. In 1917, a Model Grade School was established by DSU, which granted a high school diploma to graduates.  Capital improvement donations by philanthropist Pierre du Pont in the 1920s included funding to construct a new school building named the Du Pont Building. That building served as the only high school facility for African Americans in Kent County until 1952. “Adding an Early College High School on DSU’s campus is consistent with the University’s historic mission and would strengthen the University’s ability to serve first generation college-bound students and underrepresented minorities from the greater Dover area,” said Dr. Thompson. Students participating in the Early College High School model launched by EdWorks in Ohio have an average graduation rate of 91% and outperform state averages in high stakes graduation tests for reading, writing, and mathematics.  At the completion of four years of high school, 100% of students attending Early College High Schools have earned a minimum of 30 hours of college credit, and as many as 60% of students earn an associate’s degree, or the equivalent of 45-60 college credits.  The University intends to blend the Early College Charter High School with its existing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) Initiative.  “The Early College High School at DSU will be an innovative learning environment designed to inspire students who have the potential and motivation to be the first in their families to graduate from college,” said Dr. Thompson. “We are committed to making this school a good fit for our community.”

Kent County Science Fair Photos and Winners

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U.S. Sen. Chris Coons, co-host of the first-ever Kent County Science Fair, listens while Shawn Tazewell of Smyrna Middle School explains his project "How Caffeine Effects the Physiology of Goldfish," which won 1st Place in the Middle School Biology category.

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The first-ever Kent County Science Fair gave about 60 high school and middle school students an opportunity to show their science skills during the May 2 event held at Delaware State University. The Science Fair was co-hosted by U.S. Sen. Chris Coons and DSU, with support also coming from the Boeing Company, the Dow Chemical Company, ILC Dover, and the Delaware Biotechnology Institute. See the below slideshow for images from the Science Fair, followed by a list of the winning student projects: The following middle school and high school students and teams received the top honors for science projects in the noted award categories: High School Winners Biology:   1st Place: “Smelling of the Sexes” - Dover High School - Brittany Whitmore, Yasemin Simsek, Mika Heredia, Jada Little 2nd Place: “5-3=2 Super Senses” - Dover High School - Melvin Ross, Damon Butler 3rd Place: “Blondes versus Brunettes” - Dover High School - Tyauna Potts Chemistry: 1st Place: “Chemical Effects 0f Catalysts”  Smyrna High School - Dorothy Johnson, Aliyah Burton, Mary Arkoh, John Arkoh, Anthony Euren   Middle School Winners Physics and Engineering: 1st Place: “Batter Up” - William Henry Middle School - Alexxys Harris, Noah Lanouette, Dale Waite 2nd Place: “No Yolk About It - How to Keep from Cracking Your Eggs” - Sunrize Academy - Lee Ferguson   Physics and Engineering (con’t) 3rd Place (tie): “Rube Goldberg Machine” - William Henry Middle School - Hayley Scheir, Kathryn Suter 3rd Place (tie): “Marble Loop” - Milford Middle School - Dalton Carter, Danny Zang Chemistry: 1st Place: “Biodiesel”- William Henry Middle School - Jacob Harrison 2nd Place: “Chemical Reaction Crystals” - William Henry Middle School - Jing Rue Lin 3rd Place: “ Soda…Rust Remover?” - Central Middle - Carolyn Lewis, Monica Elavarthi Biology: 1st Place: “How Caffeine Effects the Physiology of Goldfish” - Smyrna Middle School -Shawn Tazewell 2nd Place: “The Effects of High Glycemic Foods have on Blood Sugar” - William Henry Middle School - Emily Cook 3rd Place: “ The Effects of Nicotine on the Lungs”- Central Middle School - Anmol Gill    

Dr. Robin Williams Hosts 2nd Annual First Lady's Tea for Senior Ladies

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Dr. Robin Williams and the graduating senior women who attended her 2nd annual First Lady's Tea take a parting shot moment at the end of the May 18 event.

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Dr. Robin Williams held her 2nd annual First Lady’s Tea on May 18 for the graduating senior ladies in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center. The event featured the hat-making skills of the senior ladies, as well as food, gifts, as well as some useful etiquette and interviewing wisdom. See the below photo slideshow for images from the event:  

DSU Named as Tree Campus USA

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(L-r) DSU Provost Alton Thompson, research professor Dr. Arthur Tucker, herbarium educator Dr. Susan Yost, DSU President Harry L. Williams, Gov. Jack Markell, assistant professor of agriculture Dr. Sathya Elavarthi, and Delaware State Forester Michael Valenti, celebrate the award designating DSU as a Tree Campus USA.

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Delaware State University’s observance of Arbor Day included being honored with a new distinction – it has been named a “Tree Campus USA.” As part of the state observance of Arbor Day, Gov. Jack Markell and a local youth plant a new American Holly tree -- the official state tree -- outside of the MLK Jr. Student Center. DSU hosted Gov. Jack Markell’s annual observance of Arbor Day on May 3 in the Martin Luther King Jr. Student Center, where the governor announced the honor to DSU. The Tree Campus USA designation goes to schools that have an implemented plan for tree care that is supported by school allocations, an established Campus Tree Advisory Committee, related education outreach, as well as an annual observance of Arbor Day. While being among 148 schools in the country to have the Tree Campus USA designation, DSU is the only school in Delaware with that title and is currently the only Historically Black College or University in the nation to be recognized as such. DSU main campus in Dover currently has hundreds of trees  that are represented by 130 different species. DSU President Harry L. Williams commended the University’s Herbarium staff for their work in identifying the species of trees on our campus. “That work led Dr. Susan Yost, who is the Herbarium educator, to create the Campus Tree Walk and the DSU Tree Map in 2006 on campus,” Dr. Williams said. “The tour – given about seven to eight times a year – gives our students and the public an opportunity to learn more about the different species of trees and other plants on campus.”

DSU Class of 1962 Returns to Alma Mater With $18,250 Donation

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Phil Sadler and DSU President Harry L. Williams hold a display check representing the class of 1962's donation of $18,250 to go toward DSU scholarships. The returning members of the Class of 1962 stand behind him.

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Fifteen members of DSU’s Class of 1962 celebrated their 50th anniversary by returning to their alma mater for the May 19-20 Commencement Weekend. The 1962 class was joined by other alumni and University officials during a May 19 reception in the Bank of America Building on campus. During the event, the 1962 alumni presented DSU President Harry L. Williams with a check for $18,250 to go toward scholarships. The next day, the Class of 1962 members donned robes and took part in the May 20 Commencement ceremony. Click on the below slideshow to see images from the Class of 1962 weekend, followed by a group shot and the names of the class members that returned for the weekend:   Seated (l-r): Patricia Snead Minor, Joyce King, Dolores Blakey, Delema Burris-Carter, Phyllis Hayes-Dixon, Janice Knight Boettger, Hortense Swiggett Macon, Juanita Coverdale Williams; (standing) Adele Hill Reed, Peggy Hunter Swygert, Barbara Willis, Patricia Dormaan Randall, Rev. Bill Granville, Alonzo Kittrels, Cleo Pearson, Alex T. Norwood, Phil Sadler, Hewitt Joyner, and J. Frank Marshall              

DSU, First State Manufacturing and Milford sign collaborative accord

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(Seated l-r) Milford Mayor Ronnie Rogers, DSU President Harry L. Williams, FSM co-owner Eli Valenzuela sign collaboration agreement  to develop a business accelerator in the MIlford-area. Standing (l-r): U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, Dr. Michael Casson, Dr. Nanda Viswanathan, Sher Valenzuela, and Ashley Wolfe. The collaboration is expected to bring increased economic development and job growth to Kent and Sussex counties.

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Delaware State University joined with First State Manufacturing (FSM) and the City of Milford, Del., to announce a new public-private partnership that is expected to stimulate economic development efforts in Kent and Sussex counties. With U.S. Sen. Tom Carper, DSU President Harry L. Williams and Milford Mayor Ronnie Rogers taking part in the media event held May 4 at the FSM facility in Milford, the Small Business Administration announced the launching of the “First State Moves the Nation” Small Business Accelerator. DSU's Dr. Michael Casson said the collaboration will leverage the resources of the partners. Sen. Carper noted the growth of DSU over the years. “Look at it now, with record enrollment and retention, and now DSU is on its way to be an economic engine in Delaware,” he said. As partners in the Small Business Accelerator initiative: DSU’s Center for Economic Development and International Trade (DSU CEDIT) will provide intellectual resources such as economic development forecast data, empirical analyses based on models of the state’s economy, as well as incubator-type services such as marketing research, accounting, project management and IT services. First State Manufacturing will provide 10,000 square feet of physical space at its Milford facility, which will service as an on-site business accelerator. The leadership of FSM will also work with DSU CEDIT to provide a standard and vision for its economic development model, and also serve as part of a  Solutions Group that will contribute information on business solutions and best practices in the area of manufacturing. The City of Milford will commit to leveraging  its economic development resources to provide opportunity and training, oversee the continuation of its Strategic Plan goals and initiatives that will support business development in the city, and actively promote partnerships among business, government and nonprofit sectors in support of job growth in the city. The DSU president noted that this is the type of initiative to which DSU desires to apply its expertise. “After I became president, we looked at how DSU can be a player in this state; and in the vision statement we developed in my first year, it was noted that DSU’s goal is to invigorate the economy of Delaware and the Mid-Atlantic Region,” Dr. Williams said. “This partnership actualizes that vision.” FSM – owned by Eli Valenzuela (president), his wife Sher Valenzuela (vice president), and Ashley Wolfe (executive director) – is an industrial upholstery manufacturing and solutions business in Milford that brings to the business accelerator initiative its experience starting as a small business operated out of a one-car garage in 1998 and developing into a highly successful award-winning company that carries out its work in a 70,000 square-foot facility and employs 70 people. (L-r) FSM's Ashley Wolfe, Eli and Sher Valenzuela; Milford Mayor Ronnie Rogers; Dr. Michael Casson, DSU CEDIT co-director; DSU President Harry L. Williams; Tony Leta, Del. director of the Small Business Administration; Dr. Shelton Rhodes, dean of the DSU College of Business; U.S. Sen. Tom Carper; Dr. Nanda Viswanathan, co-director of DSU CEDIT; and DSU Provost Alton Thompson. “Our story is a Delaware story, and we believe it be the story of others as well,” Mrs. Valenzuela said. She said the business accelerator can bring about an economic ecosystem that will result in “intelligent consumers” of resources. “This business accelerator is going to support the four sectors of business – manufacturing, agriculture, tourism and health care,” Mrs. Valenzuela said. Dr. Michael Casson, who along with Dr. Nanda Viswanathan serves as DSU CEDIT co-directors, noted that the state of the economy and the needed commitment to Delaware’s citizens are addressed by this initiative. “The accelerator will be home to the expertise and resources of DSU, the City of Milford and FSM, all working collaboratively to support entrepreneurship and job growth,” Dr. Casson said.  

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